CATEGORIES

African Violets

Can I Use Succulent Soil For African Violets

Can I Use Succulent Soil For African Violets

The potting mix should be airy, loose and light while still holding adequate amount of water.Compacted, heavy and dense potting mix deter root growth.You might also wanna choose the potting mix based on the indoor conditions.For example, low humid conditions require potting mix that has a lot of organic content.You can add peat moss, coarse sand, Perlite and Vermiculite to the regular potting mix.You may also add earthworm castings, compost and aged bark to the potting mix.Note: Wet the potting mix when planting African violets in it.Miracle Gro has a specific potting mix that’s made for African violets.The roots will probably rot if you plant African violets in regular potting mix.Regular potting mix has too much organic matter for African violets’ preference.No, you shouldn’t plant your African violets in potting mix that’s made for orchids.Orchids and African violets, both might require a well-draining potting mix but they grow in different conditions.Succulent potting mix doesn’t hold as much water as African violets would like.Composted pieces of aged bark would fit perfectly in this potting mix.You ideally want the major portion of it to be Vermiculite, Perlite and the regular potting mix.You can further amend the potting mix to reduce the nutrients to suit cacti’s needs.You can buy African violet potting mix from Amazon, Lowe’s or Walmart.Miracle Gro has a product that’s specifically made to use with African violets.

What To Fertilize African Violets With

What To Fertilize African Violets With

Fertilizer is an essential part of keeping houseplants happy—and that includes your dainty African violet.This novice-friendly guide to African violet fertilizer will get you up to speed with what it takes to grow a healthy, hearty houseplant.In nature, decaying organic matter replenishes these nutrients as surrounding plant life depletes them.Because they grow in limited soil, and there’s no decaying matter to complete the cycle, they eventually use up all of the nutrients available.Total depletion is a slow process; plants can survive for quite some time without a soil refresh.But surviving isn’t thriving, and with flowering plants like the African violet, that usually means no beautiful blooms.If your African violet leaves are stunted or turning a pale yellow color, they may be nitrogen deficient.Potassium strengthens and fortifies plants, which helps them resist disease and grow strong root systems.African violets low on potassium can have leaves that yellow and turn brown at the tips.Figuring out what’s best for your plant can make a newbie’s head spin, but it’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it.Organic materials like manure, fish, and seaweed return nutrients to the soil the same way as in nature, through decay.Although this slightly stinky option is less common for indoor houseplants, you can make homemade African violet fertilizer or buy a natural product at the store.Synthetic fertilizer is more popular indoors for two reasons: it’s generally odorless, and you can control the dosage, which is important in small containers.The two most popular types of African violet fertilizer are concentrated liquids and soluble powder.Since bottom-watering is common with African violets, this is an effective way to hydrate and feed your plant at the same time.When it comes to fertilizer, your biggest risks are burning your plant’s sensitive roots or shocking its system with too much at once.We recommend avoiding products that contain urea, a synthetic chemical widely used in fertilizers to replenish nitrogen.Because of its extremely high nitrogen levels, urea can be detrimental to delicate African violets growing in limited soil.Houseplant Pro Tip: There is some debate about whether African violets should be fertilized in the winter since, technically, their growing season can last all year.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

What Do Aphids Look Like On African Violets

What Do Aphids Look Like On African Violets

Placing the African violet in a sink or tub and hosing it down with a strong stream of water rinses the pests off your plant and down the drain.Insecticidal soaps sometimes burn plant leaves, so test the solution on a small section of an inconspicuous leaf and check for damage about 48 hours later.Treat Plants Outdoors If you live in a warm enough climate to grow African violets outdoors, or if the weather is warm enough to bring houseplants outside, Upper Pinellas African Violet Society recommends treating plants with a malathion solution containing 2 teaspoons of product, 1 gallon of water and several drops of mild dish soap.Use a small hand sprayer or spray bottle to completely cover the foliage, including the tops and undersides of leaves.Malathion is toxic to honeybees, so spray your African violets in the early morning or around dusk when bees aren't actively pollinating.

African Violet Leaves Yellow Edges

African Violet Leaves Yellow Edges

The African Violets, also known as ‘Saintpaulia,’ are small colorful houseplants that produce clusters of white or purple flowers over fuzzy leaves.These beautiful plants remain green throughout the year; however, the blooms appear mostly during the growing seasons of summer and spring.The blooms on this compact plant variety vary in shades of pink, white and purple.Rose Quartz – it produces pink blooms and glossy, medium green leaves.The leaves may lose color and yellow due to old age, which is a natural and inevitable process and not something to worry about.Providing the plant with excellent care may delay the process, but the lower leaves will eventually become yellow and drop.This is also a way for the African Violet plant to give rise to new foliage and direct more of its nutrients to new growth.If the old foliage stays on for too long, it may disrupt the development of the plant’s other healthier vines and leaves.If the soil remains wet for too long, the leaves will turn bleached and form ring spots on them.When exposed to the direct, scorching sun rays, the African Violet plant’s leaves may lose color and turn yellow.Because if you place an African Violet in a dark room with insufficient lighting, the leaves react by turning yellow.Establishing a balance between extreme lighting conditions is essential to nurture a healthy African Violet plant.Continuous exposure to high humidity without any care can lead to increased susceptibility to infections.On the contrary, when put in low moisture, the African Violet plant may turn its leaves yellow.African Violets are vulnerable to pests like mealybugs, spider mites, and thrips.If you are using a pebble tray for humidity, make sure the water is refreshed every other day; else, fungus gnats can start infecting your African Violet.If the lower leaves of your African Violet are drooping and turning yellow, it is infected with root rot.To maintain the ideal humidity levels, mist your plant’s surroundings or place it with other houseplants.The yellow leaves on your plant should be trimmed to save energy and reduce the spread of pests or infection.Marcel is also the founder of Iseli International Commerce, a sole proprietorship company that publishes a variety of websites and online magazines.

African Violet Does Not Bloom

African Violet Does Not Bloom

Nothing is more frustrating than bringing home a showy African violet that drops its beautiful blooms.Or maybe your plant bloomed reliably for ages and then suddenly shed its pretty petals.Although they’ve got a reputation for being a little finicky, African violets are actually quite low maintenance once you get the conditions right.Learning more about African violet care will help you set your plant up for success (AKA perpetual bloom!However, if it has bloomed in the past, chances are you can coax even the shyest plant back into blossom.Although African violets aren’t fussy, they’ll withhold their beautiful blossoms if even just one of their key needs isn’t met.Luckily, most of the things that make your plant stop flowering are pretty easy to remedy.If your plant has stopped blooming, or is struggling to produce healthy flowers, take a look through this checklist to see if you need to make any changes in your routine.Inefficient lighting is one of the main reasons African violets drop their blooms.In the summer, place your plant in a north-facing window or somewhere it is protected from the harshest rays of the midday sun.Houseplant Pro Tip: A quarter turn once a week helps your African violet grow an even crown.Grouping your plants together boosts humidity; just keep the leaves from touching to prevent the spread of pests and disease.Placing your pot on top of a plate of pebbles and water (or a humidity tray) can also do the trick.You simply won’t be able to get your African violet to bloom again if it has depleted all of the nutrients in its soil.We recommend using a gentle formula every time you water for a steady boost that goes soft on sensitive roots.Learn about common African violet problems to determine if pests or disease are to blame for your plant’s sudden stage fright.You might notice extra crowns, suckers, or random leaf clusters shooting off from the main plant.If your African violet is blooming year-round, it will regularly have petals that are ready for the great greenhouse in the sky.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

African Violets For Sale Brisbane

African Violets For Sale Brisbane

This guide will teach you everything you need to know to pick the best retailer, the perfect plant, and the right tools to keep your African violet happy and healthy for years to come.Nursery staff at these businesses are knowledgeable and can help answer your pressing questions and concerns.Placement: African violets like indirect light and will burn in direct sunlight.Color: African violets come in a wide range of vibrant hues, giving you the creative freedom to select one (or a dozen!).Check out our guide to African violet color pairing for artistic inspiration.Check out 5 Growing Tips to Consider Before You Buy an African Violet to learn more about ongoing care.At African Violet Resource Center, we offer the highest-quality tools and products to keep your plant happy for the long haul.Plants take up nutrients from the soil as they grow and fertilizer replaces what they’ve depleted.But African violets’ delicate root systems are easily scorched by conventional fertilizers.Our gentle plant food is specially formulated to provide key elements for growth, improve nutrient uptake, and correct soil deficiencies.Instead of guessing and suffocating your plant, use a soil moisture meter to determine when it’s time for a drink.These flowers are easy to propagate (meaning you only need to figure out where to buy African violets once!).They boost your mood, beautify your space, and reward you for your loving care by growing strong and healthy.Our book Houseplants for Millennials is an easy-to-understand guide to growing happy, healthy plant babies.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

How Large Do African Violets Grow

How Large Do African Violets Grow

Our large showplants are disbudded (not allowed to bud or bloom) continually from 6-8 months to about 6-10 weeks prior to the show.Most exhibitors also use leaf supports, or “rings”, which go underneath the outer row of leaves and keep them from bending down over the rim of the pot.This ensures that the leaves are held flat, and are exposed to the maximum amount of light, which promotes more vigorous growth.

What Causes White Spots On African Violet Leaves

What Causes White Spots On African Violet Leaves

With bright blooms and lovely fuzzy leaves, it’s no wonder African violets are beloved the world over.And whether you’re dealing with brown spots, crispy edges, or a mysterious powdery intruder, you’ll need to take immediate action to correct what isn’t working.African violet leaves curling under is one of the most common issues you can experience with your plant.That’s because this symptom is usually caused by one of the African violet’s two biggest enemies: cold air and direct sunlight.If you think cold air is the culprit, rescue your African violet from that drafty hallway or chilly great room and transport it somewhere more pleasant.If you have trouble maintaining a consistent temperature in your home during winter months, consider supporting your plant with a small heat lamp or grow light.If you accidentally get your plant’s leaves wet while watering, and they’re exposed to direct sunlight, it can lead to brown spots and sunburn.African violets have delicate root systems that can easily struggle when exposed to overfertilization.If you notice orange or yellow-ish crystals, gently flush the soil with room-temperature water (while avoiding the leaves).We recommend using a gentle, urea-free fertilizer moving forward to prevent nutrient buildup underground.We know what happens when you expose wet African violet leaves to sunlight: they turn brown and burn.That’s because water that’s colder or warmer than your plant’s base temperature can shock and kill the cells in the leaf.As it nears the end of its life cycle, your plant will stop sending nutrients in its direction; instead, it saves that energy for higher-functioning foliage.African violets grow from the crown outward, so if you notice the leaves closest to the surface turning yellow, they’re probably on their way out.When an African violet stays in oversaturated soil for too long, air can’t reach the roots.Trim black or gunky sections, and repot in specialty African violet mix.But if they’re developing near the center of the leaf and your plant appears otherwise healthy, sunlight may not be the culprit.If you notice white blotches across your African violet’s leaves during the colder months, quickly isolate your plant: you may have a pesky intruder.Toasty temperatures and closed windows make winter months an ideal breeding ground for this powdery pest.If your plant has fallen victim, remove all affected foliage and isolate it in a room with better circulation (or near a small fan) while you monitor for additional outbreaks.Our blog 6 Signs Your African Violet Is Dying can help you identify what needs fixing and revive your plant before it’s too late.Once you’ve averted disaster, follow these five tips to keep your African violet alive for years to come.Monitor your plant regularly for African violet leaf problems, flower loss, or soil issues—and correct any inconsistencies before they become a bigger issue.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

African Violets For Sale In San Antonio

African Violets For Sale In San Antonio

Standard African violets Large, colorful blooms Some even in stripes!Same colors and leaves as standards We're famous for our miniature hybrids Favorites of both collectors and exhibitors.Trailing African violets Same blooms and leaves Branching and spreading Grow as ground cover or hanging basket!Kohleria Spotted blooms, upright growing Heavy bloomer Almost indestructible Great for novices.Columnea Another 'gesneriad' African violet relatives Huge selection -rare and unusual Too many to show View online catalog!We specialize in African violets and their relatives (gesneriads), and other plants suitable for the indoor home environment.Most are of a manageable size (can be grown on a windowsill or light stand), and many will bloom readily in the home.Use our “search function” to answer your question–for example, type “repot African violets”, if this is what you need to know.Our “plant care” pages contain much useful information, including “how to” lessons, and a FAQ (frequently asked questions) library.If you’ve purchased a plant from us, and are having difficulties growing it, or simply need more information on its care, we can always be reached by email or phone during business hours.We offer incentives to join (a free plant with an AVSA membership) and encourage members to participate and exhibit (coupons for show winners).

How Do You Revive A Wilted African Violet

How Do You Revive A Wilted African Violet

Learn the six most common signs your African violet is dying and what you can do to nurse your plant back to health.You choose the perfect decorative pot for your African violet, and it quickly becomes your favorite tabletop centerpiece.Let’s take a look at the six most common signs your African violet is sick, and learn how to nurse your favorite big-bloomed, fuzzy-leafed plant back to health in no time.Give your African violet a good drink, make sure it’s not sitting in direct sunlight, and start a fertilizer routine to nourish your plant.Crown and stem rot is most often caused by over-watering—the most common way new growers accidentally kill their African violets.Burnt, dry, or crumbly leaf tips are a sure sign your African violet lacks moisture.Professional Tip: If you keep your home cool and dry, consider putting your African violet on a humidity tray.If it’s been a while since you watered your African violet, give it a good drink; its leaves should spring back to life within 24 hours.While some air circulation is good for the plant, African violets don’t do well when positioned directly in front of heating or air-conditioning vents.Professional Tip: If you’re on a budget, you can make a plant-safe mildew solution with baking soda, water, and a spray bottle.To encourage healing and new growth, move your African violet to a room that receives ample indirect sunlight or hang a sheer curtain between your light source and your plant to help diffuse the direct rays.Repot your plant, use fresh potting mix , and try a ta fungicide or homemade solution to ward off the existing mold.&nb.Move your plant to a location with indirect sunlight or use a sheer curtain to diffuse harsh rays.For continued success, explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other African violet plant lovers in our Facebook group.

African Violet No Longer Blooms

African Violet No Longer Blooms

Nothing is more frustrating than bringing home a showy African violet that drops its beautiful blooms.Or maybe your plant bloomed reliably for ages and then suddenly shed its pretty petals.Although they’ve got a reputation for being a little finicky, African violets are actually quite low maintenance once you get the conditions right.Learning more about African violet care will help you set your plant up for success (AKA perpetual bloom!However, if it has bloomed in the past, chances are you can coax even the shyest plant back into blossom.Although African violets aren’t fussy, they’ll withhold their beautiful blossoms if even just one of their key needs isn’t met.Luckily, most of the things that make your plant stop flowering are pretty easy to remedy.If your plant has stopped blooming, or is struggling to produce healthy flowers, take a look through this checklist to see if you need to make any changes in your routine.Inefficient lighting is one of the main reasons African violets drop their blooms.In the summer, place your plant in a north-facing window or somewhere it is protected from the harshest rays of the midday sun.Houseplant Pro Tip: A quarter turn once a week helps your African violet grow an even crown.Grouping your plants together boosts humidity; just keep the leaves from touching to prevent the spread of pests and disease.Placing your pot on top of a plate of pebbles and water (or a humidity tray) can also do the trick.You simply won’t be able to get your African violet to bloom again if it has depleted all of the nutrients in its soil.We recommend using a gentle formula every time you water for a steady boost that goes soft on sensitive roots.Learn about common African violet problems to determine if pests or disease are to blame for your plant’s sudden stage fright.You might notice extra crowns, suckers, or random leaf clusters shooting off from the main plant.If your African violet is blooming year-round, it will regularly have petals that are ready for the great greenhouse in the sky.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

Fischer African Violets Plants For Sale

Fischer African Violets Plants For Sale

Standard African violets Large, colorful blooms Some even in stripes!Same colors and leaves as standards We're famous for our miniature hybrids Favorites of both collectors and exhibitors.Trailing African violets Same blooms and leaves Branching and spreading Grow as ground cover or hanging basket!Kohleria Spotted blooms, upright growing Heavy bloomer Almost indestructible Great for novices.Columnea Another 'gesneriad' African violet relatives Huge selection -rare and unusual Too many to show View online catalog!We specialize in African violets and their relatives (gesneriads), and other plants suitable for the indoor home environment.Most are of a manageable size (can be grown on a windowsill or light stand), and many will bloom readily in the home.Use our “search function” to answer your question–for example, type “repot African violets”, if this is what you need to know.Our “plant care” pages contain much useful information, including “how to” lessons, and a FAQ (frequently asked questions) library.If you’ve purchased a plant from us, and are having difficulties growing it, or simply need more information on its care, we can always be reached by email or phone during business hours.We offer incentives to join (a free plant with an AVSA membership) and encourage members to participate and exhibit (coupons for show winners).

Why African Violet Leaves Turn Yellow

Why African Violet Leaves Turn Yellow

The African Violets, also known as ‘Saintpaulia,’ are small colorful houseplants that produce clusters of white or purple flowers over fuzzy leaves.These beautiful plants remain green throughout the year; however, the blooms appear mostly during the growing seasons of summer and spring.The blooms on this compact plant variety vary in shades of pink, white and purple.Rose Quartz – it produces pink blooms and glossy, medium green leaves.The leaves may lose color and yellow due to old age, which is a natural and inevitable process and not something to worry about.Providing the plant with excellent care may delay the process, but the lower leaves will eventually become yellow and drop.This is also a way for the African Violet plant to give rise to new foliage and direct more of its nutrients to new growth.If the old foliage stays on for too long, it may disrupt the development of the plant’s other healthier vines and leaves.If the soil remains wet for too long, the leaves will turn bleached and form ring spots on them.When exposed to the direct, scorching sun rays, the African Violet plant’s leaves may lose color and turn yellow.Because if you place an African Violet in a dark room with insufficient lighting, the leaves react by turning yellow.Establishing a balance between extreme lighting conditions is essential to nurture a healthy African Violet plant.Continuous exposure to high humidity without any care can lead to increased susceptibility to infections.On the contrary, when put in low moisture, the African Violet plant may turn its leaves yellow.African Violets are vulnerable to pests like mealybugs, spider mites, and thrips.If you are using a pebble tray for humidity, make sure the water is refreshed every other day; else, fungus gnats can start infecting your African Violet.If the lower leaves of your African Violet are drooping and turning yellow, it is infected with root rot.To maintain the ideal humidity levels, mist your plant’s surroundings or place it with other houseplants.The yellow leaves on your plant should be trimmed to save energy and reduce the spread of pests or infection.Marcel is also the founder of Iseli International Commerce, a sole proprietorship company that publishes a variety of websites and online magazines.

Can African Violets Grow Outside In Florida

Can African Violets Grow Outside In Florida

Members include people from Collier and Lee counties, and run the gamut from beginner to expert -- from those whose collections number in the hundreds, to others, like Louann Lordon, who has "only a few" ?- 25 or so.Publicity Chairman Anna Marie Rinick of Cape Coral says she joined as a newbie.Now her collection of African Violets and their relatives includes 300 or more plants for which she has won numerous blue ribbons and best of show rosettes.An avid outside gardener "up North," Rinick says she found that the heat and critters kept her indoors after she moved to Southwest Florida.In 1995 she and her husband, Hank, attended the lectures at an African Violet show and sale in Fort Myers, started going to club meetings, and got hooked on the fuzzy-leaved plants.Rinick is now an accredited judge of African Violets, and she emphasizes that the learning process never ends.If you don't want to go home with a tray of plants and cuttings, do not make eye contact with this enthusiastic salesman.Hank Rinick also makes a custom potting mix of equal parts Canadian sphagnum moss, perlite, vermiculite, and a "handful" of charcoal, which he sells at cost to club members.They are in the genus Saintpaulia, named for one Walter von Saint Paul-Illaire, who was the first to collect plant specimens that were described scientifically.St.

African Violets For Sale Perth Wa

African Violets For Sale Perth Wa

When Baron Walter von Saint Paul first brought a flowering plant he called the Usambara violet from East Africa to Germany in 1894, little did he know how many people would fall passionately in love with the African violet.Her methods have produced a houseful of continuously blooming African violets, many of which sport blue ribbons won at flower shows.African violets should grow well in any window with good bright light, not shaded by a porch or trees.In south-facing windows, protect violets from hot sun in summer with sheer curtains or blinds.For east and west windows, check to see that plants do not get too warm when the sun is in that area.An African violet on a table in the middle of a room may look pretty, but may not receive sufficient light to keep blooming.The best guide is to feel the top of the soil: if it is dry to the touch, then it is time to water.The fine roots of an African violet need air, which cannot penetrate a soggy wet soil mass.Once you’ve mastered how to water African violets, half of your work is done.Salts may build up on clay pots, rotting violet leaves resting on the top rim.Protect the leaf stems by using a folded strip of aluminum foil to cover the top rim of a clay pot.African violets need food when producing blossoms, and since the plant ideally should bloom continuously.It is a good practice to remove all African violet leaves that have started to decay.What should be done with an African violet has developed a thick stem below the bottom leaves?If the “neck” is too high, carefully remove some of the old soil from around the violet’s roots, so it can be lowered further down into the pot.Repot so that the lower layer of healthy green leaves rests on the soil line at the top of the pot.While, we are no longer able to respond to questions about African violets that are not covered within this article, you may find the answer you are seeking in the comment section below.

How Often To African Violets Bloom

How Often To African Violets Bloom

Nothing is more frustrating than bringing home a showy African violet that drops its beautiful blooms.Or maybe your plant bloomed reliably for ages and then suddenly shed its pretty petals.Although they’ve got a reputation for being a little finicky, African violets are actually quite low maintenance once you get the conditions right.Learning more about African violet care will help you set your plant up for success (AKA perpetual bloom!However, if it has bloomed in the past, chances are you can coax even the shyest plant back into blossom.Although African violets aren’t fussy, they’ll withhold their beautiful blossoms if even just one of their key needs isn’t met.Luckily, most of the things that make your plant stop flowering are pretty easy to remedy.If your plant has stopped blooming, or is struggling to produce healthy flowers, take a look through this checklist to see if you need to make any changes in your routine.Inefficient lighting is one of the main reasons African violets drop their blooms.In the summer, place your plant in a north-facing window or somewhere it is protected from the harshest rays of the midday sun.Houseplant Pro Tip: A quarter turn once a week helps your African violet grow an even crown.Grouping your plants together boosts humidity; just keep the leaves from touching to prevent the spread of pests and disease.Placing your pot on top of a plate of pebbles and water (or a humidity tray) can also do the trick.You simply won’t be able to get your African violet to bloom again if it has depleted all of the nutrients in its soil.We recommend using a gentle formula every time you water for a steady boost that goes soft on sensitive roots.Learn about common African violet problems to determine if pests or disease are to blame for your plant’s sudden stage fright.You might notice extra crowns, suckers, or random leaf clusters shooting off from the main plant.If your African violet is blooming year-round, it will regularly have petals that are ready for the great greenhouse in the sky.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

Do African Violets Like To Be Root Bound

Do African Violets Like To Be Root Bound

However, there’s one important practice that can make novice growers shake in their garden boots: repotting.African violets have several notorious quirks: they don’t like getting wet; they’re sun-sensitive; and they struggle in standard soil—just to name a few.Like most aspects of African violet care, repotting is quite easy, and a lot less scary if you master a few simple steps.Repotting your plant replenishes depleted nutrients, balances soil chemistry, and accommodates new growth.Or, perhaps you notice roots escaping out the drainage hole and sneaking over the soil surface (a red flag your plant is becoming root-bound).Houseplant Pro Tip: African violets are happiest in containers that are about ⅓ the diameter of the spread of their leaves.Scrub-a-Dub: African violet repotting is a prime time for pests and diseases to find a new host.With less porous containers, like plastic or ceramic, it’s wise to hold off until after you’ve finished the job.Tilt the pot sideways or upside down and tap the bottom; if it doesn’t pop right out, stick your finger through the drainage hole and give it a push.African violets tend to grow haphazardly, so now’s a great time to trim uneven leaves and satellite suckers.Some experts suggest removing existing blossoms to give your plant more energy to recover (don’t worry, it’ll bounce back!Place a thin layer of soil inside the pot and set the root ball on top.African violets love fluffy, slightly acidic soil; they’ll struggle in a standard mix.Check out our guide to African violet potting mix to learn all about the perfect blend.We also recommend noting the date on a paper plant tag so you don’t forget when you repotted last.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

How To Get Your African Violet To Bloom Again

How To Get Your African Violet To Bloom Again

Nothing is more frustrating than bringing home a showy African violet that drops its beautiful blooms.Or maybe your plant bloomed reliably for ages and then suddenly shed its pretty petals.Although they’ve got a reputation for being a little finicky, African violets are actually quite low maintenance once you get the conditions right.Learning more about African violet care will help you set your plant up for success (AKA perpetual bloom!However, if it has bloomed in the past, chances are you can coax even the shyest plant back into blossom.Although African violets aren’t fussy, they’ll withhold their beautiful blossoms if even just one of their key needs isn’t met.Luckily, most of the things that make your plant stop flowering are pretty easy to remedy.If your plant has stopped blooming, or is struggling to produce healthy flowers, take a look through this checklist to see if you need to make any changes in your routine.Inefficient lighting is one of the main reasons African violets drop their blooms.In the summer, place your plant in a north-facing window or somewhere it is protected from the harshest rays of the midday sun.Houseplant Pro Tip: A quarter turn once a week helps your African violet grow an even crown.Grouping your plants together boosts humidity; just keep the leaves from touching to prevent the spread of pests and disease.Placing your pot on top of a plate of pebbles and water (or a humidity tray) can also do the trick.You simply won’t be able to get your African violet to bloom again if it has depleted all of the nutrients in its soil.We recommend using a gentle formula every time you water for a steady boost that goes soft on sensitive roots.Learn about common African violet problems to determine if pests or disease are to blame for your plant’s sudden stage fright.You might notice extra crowns, suckers, or random leaf clusters shooting off from the main plant.If your African violet is blooming year-round, it will regularly have petals that are ready for the great greenhouse in the sky.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

Where To Buy African Violets Nsw

Where To Buy African Violets Nsw

This guide will teach you everything you need to know to pick the best retailer, the perfect plant, and the right tools to keep your African violet happy and healthy for years to come.Nursery staff at these businesses are knowledgeable and can help answer your pressing questions and concerns.Placement: African violets like indirect light and will burn in direct sunlight.Color: African violets come in a wide range of vibrant hues, giving you the creative freedom to select one (or a dozen!).Check out our guide to African violet color pairing for artistic inspiration.Check out 5 Growing Tips to Consider Before You Buy an African Violet to learn more about ongoing care.At African Violet Resource Center, we offer the highest-quality tools and products to keep your plant happy for the long haul.Plants take up nutrients from the soil as they grow and fertilizer replaces what they’ve depleted.But African violets’ delicate root systems are easily scorched by conventional fertilizers.Our gentle plant food is specially formulated to provide key elements for growth, improve nutrient uptake, and correct soil deficiencies.Instead of guessing and suffocating your plant, use a soil moisture meter to determine when it’s time for a drink.These flowers are easy to propagate (meaning you only need to figure out where to buy African violets once!).They boost your mood, beautify your space, and reward you for your loving care by growing strong and healthy.Our book Houseplants for Millennials is an easy-to-understand guide to growing happy, healthy plant babies.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

African Violets For Sale Toowoomba

African Violets For Sale Toowoomba

Standard African violets Large, colorful blooms Some even in stripes!Same colors and leaves as standards We're famous for our miniature hybrids Favorites of both collectors and exhibitors.Trailing African violets Same blooms and leaves Branching and spreading Grow as ground cover or hanging basket!Kohleria Spotted blooms, upright growing Heavy bloomer Almost indestructible Great for novices.Columnea Another 'gesneriad' African violet relatives Huge selection -rare and unusual Too many to show View online catalog!We specialize in African violets and their relatives (gesneriads), and other plants suitable for the indoor home environment.Most are of a manageable size (can be grown on a windowsill or light stand), and many will bloom readily in the home.Use our “search function” to answer your question–for example, type “repot African violets”, if this is what you need to know.Our “plant care” pages contain much useful information, including “how to” lessons, and a FAQ (frequently asked questions) library.If you’ve purchased a plant from us, and are having difficulties growing it, or simply need more information on its care, we can always be reached by email or phone during business hours.We offer incentives to join (a free plant with an AVSA membership) and encourage members to participate and exhibit (coupons for show winners).

Do African Violets Like Nitrogen

Do African Violets Like Nitrogen

A good Violet Food should have approximately equal amounts of the primary nutrients, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K).These elements are normally found on the front label and will appear, for instance, as 14-12-14, which is the recommended formula for standard African Violets, such as those grown in 3-inch pots or larger.Miniature and super-miniature African Violets, such as those grown in 2-inch pots or less, will typically need a slightly different formula.While it is often cheaper to use than other sources of nitrogen, urea is known to cause Root Burn on African Violets.The damage caused by Root Burn reduces an African Violet's ability to properly absorb water and nutrients.The primary nutrients, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K), represent three of the 16 essential elements needed by African Violets and other plants for normal growth and reproduction.The other 13 essential elements are boron (B), calcium (Ca), carbon (C), chlorine (Cl), copper (Cu), hydrogen (H), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), oxygen (O), sulfur (S) and zinc (Zn).Sulfur plays an important role in the synthesis of proteins and helps boost an African Violet's resistance to disease.The free elements, carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, are the components of plant carbohydrates which are produced during photosynthesis.The major elements are calcium, carbon, hydrogen, magnesium, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, potassium and sulfur.However, while not considered essential, many trace elements have been determined to provide a beneficial effect to plants.Examples of trace elements, which may provide benefits to African Violets, are cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), silicon (Si) and sodium (Na).For instance, because it can be dispensed in drops, Optimara Miniature Plant Food can be applied directly to a MiniWell or WaterShip watering device.Many make the mistake of assuming that a concentrated liquid must be 100 percent water soluble when, in fact, the accumulation of sediment at the bottom of the bottle clearly suggests otherwise.While time-release fertilizers are designed to reduce the frequency of application, they make it easy to overfertilize, especially for those who do not have a lot of experience with them.This type of fertilizer will provide your African Violets with a constant supply of the nutrients they need, while significantly reducing the chances of overfertilizing.With experience and patience, some growers have succeeded in producing good results with organic fertilizers.While both are derived from "natural" sources, non-organic fertilizers are easier to use, more efficient and provide greater consistency in terms of both available nutrients and results.While African Violets need a certain amount of essential elements to grow and reproduce, too much can be harmful.Such imbalances in the elements that are absorbed by African Violets can cause a number of additional problems, such as droopy or chlorotic leaves, leaf tip burn and diminished flowering.This will wash away any excess fertilizer salts which have accumulated in the soil, while restoring the proper balance of the elements that African Violets need.

African Violet Care Coffee Grounds

African Violet Care Coffee Grounds

As long as you set your African violets up for success, you’ll be able to enjoy them with relatively little effort.Using the correct potting soil for African violets is one of the most important factors in keeping these beloved houseplants happy.Let’s talk about the best ways to keep your African violets happy and thriving in the perfect soil.You might have heard that you shouldn’t use a regular potting soil mix with your African violets.African violets can tolerate soil that is somewhat outside of the range of 5.8 to 6.2, but for best results, try to keep the pH near those levels.If the level gets too far out of that range, your African violets may have a difficult time absorbing the nutrients they need from the soil.Place a 3-in-1 moisture meter halfway down into the soil to check the pH level.Take your African violet out of its pot, and carefully shake it to remove as much soil from the roots as possible without damaging the plant.However, some people manage to skip doing any of these preventative measures and still don’t have any issues with pH imbalance.I only have anecdotal evidence to back this up, but it seems like pH balance is mostly an issue for people who either don’t plant their African violets in the correct soil in the first place or for people who have soft water or other water issues.You’ll only be disappointed if you try to plant your African violets in the same soil you pot the rest of your houseplants in.There’s too much risk of root rot if you plant your African violet in regular soil.As mentioned earlier, repotting can help correct a pH imbalance in your African violet’s soil.When choosing a new pot for your African violet, there are two things to keep in mind: drainage and depth.African violet roots do not like to sit in soggy soil for long periods of time, so containers without adequate drainage holes are not going to provide the right environment.A good commercial potting mix for African violets will provide the acidic soil that these houseplants need.Or instead, you can make your own potting mix to provide the correct soil for your African violets.Coffee grounds are slightly acidic and contain nitrogen, which helps plants grow healthy foliage.Occasionally sprinkling used coffee grounds on top of your African violet potting soil can be good for the plant.If you are already using a balanced fertilizer regularly, then adding coffee grounds probably won’t make much of a difference.Regular houseplant potting mix is too dense, which will lead to root rot issues in your African violets.You can use African violet potting mix for other houseplants that need soil that is both lightweight and acidic.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

Do African Violets Like Clay Pots

Do African Violets Like Clay Pots

If this does not work, try inserting a pencil or some other device into one of the drain holes in order to ease the rootball away from the pot.However, other growers suggest waiting until the Violet has already been repotted in order to minimize the amount of turgidity in the leaves and stems.Many growers recommend this, asserting that the increased humidity helps African Violets recover from any transplant shock.To do this, place the African Violet into a clear, plastic bag which is large enough to accommodate the plant without damaging the leaves or stems.After you have removed the Violet from the bag, it will be safe to resume your normal watering and fertilizer schedule.Though rare, such instances become apparent when a Violet is unable to form a cohesive rootball or when the soil remains chronically soggy, even though the pot provides adequate drainage.Because of the amount of handling required for potting down, you should employ the bagging method to minimize the effects of shock (see above).This happens, most often, when an African Violet is subjected to a disease or nutrient imbalance which predominantly affects the oldest leaves.As these leaves die off, the neck (sometimes called the stalk or main stem) of an African Violet becomes more and more exposed until it appears abnormally elongated, i.e., more than 1/2 inch long.Since all new growth originates from the center of the crown, the only way to correct this is to pot down the neck.Starting from the bottom, you must cut away a section of the rootball equal to the length of the neck.If it is seated properly, the bottom leaves of the African Violet will be resting on the rim.Another way to determine proper pot size is to measure the diameter formed by the outer edge of an African Violet's leaves.Therefore, if the diameter of your African Violet's leaves measure 12 inches, then it should be planted in a 4-inch pot.When using a bottom-watering method, drainage becomes less important, since a good potting soil will only absorb the amount of water that an African Violet needs.On plastic pots, this can be done by using a soldering iron or by simply heating up the metal shaft of a screwdriver and pushing it through the bottom.While African Violets can successfully be grown in either one, each offers different benefits and drawbacks.The porosity of them encourages the growth of algae and the accumulation of fertilizer salts, while increasing the rate of water loss.And because plastic pots are not porous, they are very easy to clean and sterilize, they conserve water by minimizing evaporation, they are not prone to the accumulation of fertilizer salts, and they discourage the growth of algae.But more importantly, because they are not porous, plastic pots contribute less to the air moisture around the plants, and aeration of the soil becomes a greater concern.For instance, the effects of accumulated fertilizer salts on clay pots can be minimized by placing aluminum foil or a coating of wax around the rim.And, of course, the aesthetic appeal of plastic pots can be enhanced with a decorative, self-watering device or a ceramic, outer container.One final consideration, in regard to clay versus plastic pots, is the use of a self-watering device.This and other self-watering devices are available online at the Selective Gardener, a mail order supplier that specializes in plant care products made specifically for African Violets.If you do not disinfect your pots, you run the risk of exposing your African Violets to Nematodes and other deadly micro organisms.This, in addition to their heavy quality, would further stifle an African Violet's ability to absorb the nutrients it needs.This contributes to the proper aeration of the potting soil, while keeping it light and porous.In addition, since peat moss by itself is very acidic, small amounts of calcium carbonate, or some type of lime, will be added to correct the pH.The pH of a potting soil is important, because if it is too high or too low, African Violets can not properly absorb nutrients.This can be done by simply sealing the potting soil into heavy aluminum foil (minus the bag, of course) and placing it into your oven.Once it has sufficiently cooled, you should seal it in a plastic bag or some other air-tight container in order to prevent contamination.

African Violets For Sale Cape Town

African Violets For Sale Cape Town

Standard African violets Large, colorful blooms Some even in stripes!Same colors and leaves as standards We're famous for our miniature hybrids Favorites of both collectors and exhibitors.Trailing African violets Same blooms and leaves Branching and spreading Grow as ground cover or hanging basket!Kohleria Spotted blooms, upright growing Heavy bloomer Almost indestructible Great for novices.Columnea Another 'gesneriad' African violet relatives Huge selection -rare and unusual Too many to show View online catalog!We specialize in African violets and their relatives (gesneriads), and other plants suitable for the indoor home environment.Most are of a manageable size (can be grown on a windowsill or light stand), and many will bloom readily in the home.Use our “search function” to answer your question–for example, type “repot African violets”, if this is what you need to know.Our “plant care” pages contain much useful information, including “how to” lessons, and a FAQ (frequently asked questions) library.If you’ve purchased a plant from us, and are having difficulties growing it, or simply need more information on its care, we can always be reached by email or phone during business hours.We offer incentives to join (a free plant with an AVSA membership) and encourage members to participate and exhibit (coupons for show winners).

How Often Does An African Violet Bloom

How Often Does An African Violet Bloom

Nothing is more frustrating than bringing home a showy African violet that drops its beautiful blooms.Or maybe your plant bloomed reliably for ages and then suddenly shed its pretty petals.Although they’ve got a reputation for being a little finicky, African violets are actually quite low maintenance once you get the conditions right.Learning more about African violet care will help you set your plant up for success (AKA perpetual bloom!However, if it has bloomed in the past, chances are you can coax even the shyest plant back into blossom.Although African violets aren’t fussy, they’ll withhold their beautiful blossoms if even just one of their key needs isn’t met.Luckily, most of the things that make your plant stop flowering are pretty easy to remedy.If your plant has stopped blooming, or is struggling to produce healthy flowers, take a look through this checklist to see if you need to make any changes in your routine.Inefficient lighting is one of the main reasons African violets drop their blooms.In the summer, place your plant in a north-facing window or somewhere it is protected from the harshest rays of the midday sun.Houseplant Pro Tip: A quarter turn once a week helps your African violet grow an even crown.Grouping your plants together boosts humidity; just keep the leaves from touching to prevent the spread of pests and disease.Placing your pot on top of a plate of pebbles and water (or a humidity tray) can also do the trick.You simply won’t be able to get your African violet to bloom again if it has depleted all of the nutrients in its soil.We recommend using a gentle formula every time you water for a steady boost that goes soft on sensitive roots.Learn about common African violet problems to determine if pests or disease are to blame for your plant’s sudden stage fright.You might notice extra crowns, suckers, or random leaf clusters shooting off from the main plant.If your African violet is blooming year-round, it will regularly have petals that are ready for the great greenhouse in the sky.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .