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African Violets

How To Water An African Violet

How To Water An African Violet

This will alter both the pH and the electrical conductivity of the soil, thereby diminishing your African Violet's ability to absorb water and nutrients.By providing the correctamount of water, a good self-watering device will greatly reduce the chances of getting any of the deadly fungi which cause plants to rot.Finally, there are some self-watering devices which, while providing the benefits already mentioned, will also increase the humidity in the area immediately around your Violets.All of the above self-watering devices are available online at the Selective Gardener, a mail order supplier that specializes in plant care products made specifically for African Violets.In such circumstances, an African Violets will stop flowering and its leaves begin to turn yellow.If you have access to a light meter, the correct luminosity for African Violets is 10,000 to 12,000 lux, or about 900 to 1100 foot candles.Also, it is important to rotate your African Violets so that they receive an equal amount of sunlight on all sides.If African Violets are not rotated in this manner, they will begin to bend towards the light and grow larger on the side closest to the window.Blue light is necessary for photosynthesis to occur and, thus, is vital for the development of green leaves and the production of plant carbohydrates.If the African Violet is too close to the grow light, it will begin to develop symptoms similar to those resulting from too much sunlight, i.e., leaf scorch.Finally, you should be aware of a condition peculiar to African Violets which are cultivated under grow lights.While not all African Violets are sensitive to this condition, those that are will develop leaves which are distinctly lighter on those areas directly exposed to the light.In terms of temperature, humidity and other factors of air quality, African Violets thrive in an environment which most people would consider pleasant.However, in case you are one of those people who thrive in otherwise unhealthy circumstances, you will need to know a little about the conditions preferred by African Violets.In fact, some African Violet hybrids require fluctuations of as much as 10 degrees in order to produce optimal flowering.Therefore, depending on how long your African Violet has been exposed to excessive heat, you may need to decrease the frequency with which it receives water.To gauge the impact on water, it will help to know that the rate of evaporation from leaves drops by half with each decrease of 20 degrees F.Moreover, cooler temperatures leave African Violets vulnerable to such deadly pathogens as Crown Rot, especially when accompanied by excessive moisture.Place your African Violet in a clear plastic bag and close the top with a wire twist.At this time, once you have removed it from the bag, it should be safe to return your African Violet to its normal watering and fertilizing schedule.In their native habitat, in the Usambara Mountains of East Africa, the relative humidity is generally about 70 to 80 percent.If the level of humidity is much less than this, an African Violet's transpiration rate will be greater than its ability to absorb water.As a consequence, buds will fail to open, plant growth will be slow, and leaves will begin to appear dry and shriveled.Another way to increase humidity is to use a self-watering device, such as the Watermaid, which relies on capillary matting to draw water into the soil.Because humidity is so important to African Violets, good air circulation also becomes a vital concern.Even when the overall air temperature is within acceptable limits, a cold draft may eventually send an African Violet into shock.Depending on the precise source, gas or chemical fumes can result in pale leaves which are smaller than normal and flowers which turn brown and drop off.If you suspect that your African Violets are being exposed to one of these substances, it is vital that the source be isolated and remedied.One way to determine if gas or chemical fumes are present has been suggested by the African Violet Society of America.They assert that a young tomato plant, when in the presence of gas or chemical fumes, will begin to sag within a few hours.

My African Violets Are Not Blooming

My African Violets Are Not Blooming

Find out all the reasons yours may be refusing to flower and how to encourage blooms and reblooming throughout the year.You’ll know the light is insufficient if the plant doesn’t bloom, the leaves grow in elongated shapes, or crowns get leggy.Soil | Use a commercial mix intended for African violets combined with perlite, or make your own.Temperature | 65-75°F (18-24°C) Humidity | 40-50 percent | I keep some of my violets sitting above plant trays filled with water.No matter what season or weather is going on outside, there are always a few plants loaded with beautiful blooms inside.These are my top tips for ensuring that your African violets not only produce flowers but rebloom again and again throughout the year.Genetics help determine bloomability (volume, size, colour, frequency), but, if you have a healthy plant, it’s very likely yours can be encouraged to flower too.In addition to the list of reasons why African violets may not bloom, I have answered Frequently Asked Questions here.And, as always, this is gardening, not magic, and plants are living things, which means changes take time.How to Grow African Violets from Leaf Cuttings | easy way to get free plants.The key is to get bright light in the morning or afternoon without excessive heat or intense sun.Signs of inadequate light include stretched leaf stems and small adult leaves.In winter, I keep mine at an east-facing window, and set them back as summer warms up.Relative humidity levels of 40 to 50% are good for many plants including African violets.Watch out for dry air caused by indoor heating systems.If your fertilizer label shows a monthly dose, reduce it down to a weekly amount and add that to your watering can.If the soil pH level is too high or too low, the plant cannot properly take up the available nutrients.You are unlikely to deal with a major pH problem with a houseplant, but keep it in mind as it is key for all plants.Common ingredients include sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, and perlite.Because harvesting peat requires the destruction of irreplaceable carbon-sequestering ecosystems (bogs), the search for sustainable alternatives is underway.How to Repot African Violets has everything you need to move your plants to the correct size pots.Unless a problem is really simple to solve and does not require buying anything, I’m much more likely to toss the plant than treat it.It’s just not worth the risk of affecting/infecting my other plants and I like to keep my indoor and outdoor gardening as simple as possible.This is one big drawback to African violets: they rarely grow in good formation.This shows how to repot African violets and deal with excess growth.The shock of a good trim and repotting can be just the thing to trigger new blooms.With good genes and the right growing conditions, you can expect flowers every 2-6 months (unless you have a genetic dud).2) Sit your potted African violet in a saucer of warm water.One popular choice is a 20-14-13 fertilizer intended for orchids or fish emulsion.There a general rule in gardening that we try to never disturb a plant while flowering because that can hasten or halt blooming.Use the right soil and only choose a larger pot if the roots have reached the edges of the current one.Keep in mind that the current conditions have (collectively) enabled blooming, so don’t stray from that if you want the flowers to continue.

Do Violets Like Acidic Soil

Do Violets Like Acidic Soil

I have a partially sunny front yard with decent grass, relatively few "normal" weeds, and a significant amount of violets.In his classic book "Lawns", Iowa State University Professor and frequent You Bet Your Garden turf grass advisor Nick Christians, Ph.D., writes that the waxy coating on their shiny leaves makes wild violets virtually invulnerable to chemical herbicides.Clover was an integral part of early seed mixes, and a clover-free lawn was considered a sign of poor care!And many people still plant small summer-blooming bulbs like grape hyacinth, crocus, species tulips and scilla directly in their lawns.By the time the turf needs its first Spring cut, the flowers will have faded and the leaves will have absorbed enough solar energy to pop up and entertain again the following year.All you're doing with that Roundup and Weed B Gon is killing frogs and toads, increasing your future risk of Parkinson's and poisoning your neighbors' well.If you MUST have an artificially perfect, eco-insensitive, mono-cultural, globally warm-criminal lawn, dig up the clumps; the heart/kidney shaped leaves make the plant easy to spot.Do this in the Fall for cool-season lawns and in the Spring for warm season ones so you can fill the holes with compost and grass seed and get a nice stand of replacement turf.I LOVE wild violets, and whenever some pop up in the 'wrong' place, I just move them to an area where I want more color in the Spring or some pollination insurance.Native bees looking for summer homes will be attracted to your violets in the Spring and then hang around and pollinate the rest of your plants all season long.They are also a tremendous source of rutin, a hard-to-find nutrient that strengthens capillary walls, preventing or reversing the visible effects of varicose and spider veins.

How To Mix African Violet Soil

How To Mix African Violet Soil

If you’re new to African violets, you just need to understand a few golden rules: keep their leaves dry; avoid direct sunlight; and be mindful of their delicate roots.A lightweight, soilless planting medium provides support without crushing or choking their delicate root systems.Many retailers carry speciality African violet potting soil, and it’s easy to make your own at home.While you’ll find dozens of African violet soil recipes online, nearly all contain three key ingredients: perlite; vermiculite; and peat moss.As the porous perlite slowly releases moisture, it boosts humidity in the environment, mimicking the steamy, jungle-like conditions beloved by your plant.It is nontoxic and doesn’t rot or mold, preventing irritating pests from finding safe harbor in your plant’s container.Vermiculite also helps keep potting mix sterile, which keeps your African violet’s blooms fresher longer.Lastly, vermiculite helps soil retain nutrients like ammonium, potassium, and calcium, and accelerates root growth and anchorage.By absorbing water, peat moss helps slow the process of leaching and retains more essential nutrients for your plant.Peat bogs also act as natural carbon sinks, and when they’re disrupted or diminished, harmful greenhouse gases are released into the atmosphere.Another factor that sets African violet soil apart is the level of acidity you’ll need to provide.Limestone: To help balance acidity (only add if using peat moss) and prevent toxicities in the soil.Superphosphate : Encourages strong root growth, great for newly propagated African violets.First, you’ll need to pasteurize them to eliminate any bacteria, plant diseases, insects, or weed seeds hiding in your ingredients.Moisten your soil mixture and spread evenly over a large roasting tray or lipped cookie sheet.Monitor the temperature with a cooking thermometer; don’t let it heat above 180º Fahrenheit or the healthy bacteria in your mix will be eliminated as well.Remove the foil and set your mix in the open air for at least four days, stirring several times daily to aerate the soil.Once your soil has aired out for the appropriate time, proceed to use what you need to fill your African violet pots and store the rest in a cool, dry place.African violets are one of the most popular houseplants in the world, so many retailers—like Walmart and Menards—sell mix made specially to provide their preferred conditions.Once you’ve mastered African violet potting mix, you may want to repot your current plants to introduce fresh, nutrient-rich soil.African violets often grow sucker offshoots with their own root systems, which are easy to separate from the mother plants and rehome.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

Can African Violets Grow Outside In Australia

Can African Violets Grow Outside In Australia

African violets are known for their vibrant foliage, making them one of the world’s most popular indoor plants.But this might have you wondering, “Why keep those beautiful blooms out of sight?” Like many gardeners, you probably want to show these gorgeous plants off outdoors.When it comes to caring for African violets, there’s ample dispute between “tried-and-true” techniques and “This usually works for me!”—which can make online forums rather daunting.Outdoor environments are simply too unpredictable to provide the Goldilocks conditions these plants need to thrive.Some growers argue certain regions provide more favorable conditions; others swear their African violets do best when placed outdoors part-time; and many declare a definitive “NO” when it comes to the question completely.Beneath the jungle canopy, African violets grew accustomed to pleasant temperatures, protection from the sun, and a humid atmosphere.Most regions are too hot or too cold, too sunny or too wet, or have too low or unstable levels of humidity.African violets are also prone to pests and insect damage, which is, naturally, a bigger concern outdoors.But, with completely different origins and evolutionary paths, what works for a “normal” violet won’t necessarily cut it for your lovely, fuzzy mimic.They won’t tolerate extended periods outside of these ranges, which makes them better suited for the pleasant temperatures inside your home.And lastly, your plant requires high humidity levels, which are much easier to provide indoors.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

How To Get My African Violet To Bloom

How To Get My African Violet To Bloom

Nothing is more frustrating than bringing home a showy African violet that drops its beautiful blooms.Or maybe your plant bloomed reliably for ages and then suddenly shed its pretty petals.Although they’ve got a reputation for being a little finicky, African violets are actually quite low maintenance once you get the conditions right.Learning more about African violet care will help you set your plant up for success (AKA perpetual bloom!However, if it has bloomed in the past, chances are you can coax even the shyest plant back into blossom.Although African violets aren’t fussy, they’ll withhold their beautiful blossoms if even just one of their key needs isn’t met.Luckily, most of the things that make your plant stop flowering are pretty easy to remedy.If your plant has stopped blooming, or is struggling to produce healthy flowers, take a look through this checklist to see if you need to make any changes in your routine.Inefficient lighting is one of the main reasons African violets drop their blooms.In the summer, place your plant in a north-facing window or somewhere it is protected from the harshest rays of the midday sun.Houseplant Pro Tip: A quarter turn once a week helps your African violet grow an even crown.Grouping your plants together boosts humidity; just keep the leaves from touching to prevent the spread of pests and disease.Placing your pot on top of a plate of pebbles and water (or a humidity tray) can also do the trick.You simply won’t be able to get your African violet to bloom again if it has depleted all of the nutrients in its soil.We recommend using a gentle formula every time you water for a steady boost that goes soft on sensitive roots.Learn about common African violet problems to determine if pests or disease are to blame for your plant’s sudden stage fright.You might notice extra crowns, suckers, or random leaf clusters shooting off from the main plant.If your African violet is blooming year-round, it will regularly have petals that are ready for the great greenhouse in the sky.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

African Violet Grow In Water

African Violet Grow In Water

With so many new coleus varieties hitting the market each spring, it's easy to design an entire garden around the orange, purple, and chartreuse leaves of this tropical plant.

How To Fertilize African Violet

How To Fertilize African Violet

Fertilizer is an essential part of keeping houseplants happy—and that includes your dainty African violet.This novice-friendly guide to African violet fertilizer will get you up to speed with what it takes to grow a healthy, hearty houseplant.In nature, decaying organic matter replenishes these nutrients as surrounding plant life depletes them.Because they grow in limited soil, and there’s no decaying matter to complete the cycle, they eventually use up all of the nutrients available.Total depletion is a slow process; plants can survive for quite some time without a soil refresh.But surviving isn’t thriving, and with flowering plants like the African violet, that usually means no beautiful blooms.If your African violet leaves are stunted or turning a pale yellow color, they may be nitrogen deficient.Potassium strengthens and fortifies plants, which helps them resist disease and grow strong root systems.African violets low on potassium can have leaves that yellow and turn brown at the tips.Figuring out what’s best for your plant can make a newbie’s head spin, but it’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it.Organic materials like manure, fish, and seaweed return nutrients to the soil the same way as in nature, through decay.Although this slightly stinky option is less common for indoor houseplants, you can make homemade African violet fertilizer or buy a natural product at the store.Synthetic fertilizer is more popular indoors for two reasons: it’s generally odorless, and you can control the dosage, which is important in small containers.The two most popular types of African violet fertilizer are concentrated liquids and soluble powder.Since bottom-watering is common with African violets, this is an effective way to hydrate and feed your plant at the same time.When it comes to fertilizer, your biggest risks are burning your plant’s sensitive roots or shocking its system with too much at once.We recommend avoiding products that contain urea, a synthetic chemical widely used in fertilizers to replenish nitrogen.Because of its extremely high nitrogen levels, urea can be detrimental to delicate African violets growing in limited soil.Houseplant Pro Tip: There is some debate about whether African violets should be fertilized in the winter since, technically, their growing season can last all year.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

How Often Can African Violets Bloom

How Often Can African Violets Bloom

Nothing is more frustrating than bringing home a showy African violet that drops its beautiful blooms.Or maybe your plant bloomed reliably for ages and then suddenly shed its pretty petals.Although they’ve got a reputation for being a little finicky, African violets are actually quite low maintenance once you get the conditions right.Learning more about African violet care will help you set your plant up for success (AKA perpetual bloom!However, if it has bloomed in the past, chances are you can coax even the shyest plant back into blossom.Although African violets aren’t fussy, they’ll withhold their beautiful blossoms if even just one of their key needs isn’t met.Luckily, most of the things that make your plant stop flowering are pretty easy to remedy.If your plant has stopped blooming, or is struggling to produce healthy flowers, take a look through this checklist to see if you need to make any changes in your routine.Inefficient lighting is one of the main reasons African violets drop their blooms.In the summer, place your plant in a north-facing window or somewhere it is protected from the harshest rays of the midday sun.Houseplant Pro Tip: A quarter turn once a week helps your African violet grow an even crown.Grouping your plants together boosts humidity; just keep the leaves from touching to prevent the spread of pests and disease.Placing your pot on top of a plate of pebbles and water (or a humidity tray) can also do the trick.You simply won’t be able to get your African violet to bloom again if it has depleted all of the nutrients in its soil.We recommend using a gentle formula every time you water for a steady boost that goes soft on sensitive roots.Learn about common African violet problems to determine if pests or disease are to blame for your plant’s sudden stage fright.You might notice extra crowns, suckers, or random leaf clusters shooting off from the main plant.If your African violet is blooming year-round, it will regularly have petals that are ready for the great greenhouse in the sky.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

Can You Grow African Violets In Water

Can You Grow African Violets In Water

Want to expand your African violet collection or give gifts to fellow houseplant lovers?There are multiple methods for propagating African violets, all of which are easy enough that even a beginner should have some success.Growing new African violets from seeds is not as common as starting African violets from cutting or dividing plants; however, it takes just as long and you’ll get more plants from seeds.The surprise makes starting African violets from seeds fun and rewarding.Once you have the seeds, you’ll prepare to plant them by adding a few tablespoons of water to your growing medium until it feels moist.Not all African violet seeds will germinate, so don’t feel bad when a few refuse to sprout.It takes a little patience, but the fun of seeing which African violet varieties emerge is well worth the wait.Most people choose to propagate African violets by leaf cutting over seeds.You also don’t need to order anything because you’ll take the cutting directly from a plant you already have.Both methods are easy to follow and usually result in a new healthy African violet.Not every cutting will successfully create a new African violet, so you need to pick a few extra leaves.The top layers are not quite mature enough to create strong new plants, and the bottom leaves are past their prime.Make the cut at a 45-degree angle to give the stem more surface area for roots.Prepare your containers by filling them with African violet potting mix.African violets need lightweight soil that allows water to drain quickly.These little plants will have the best chance of surviving if you allow them to develop 3-4 leaves before removing them from the cutting and potting them on their own.When you move the tiny new plants to their own containers, be sure to use African violet potting soil.If you’re one of these houseplant lovers, the good news is that it’s very easy to propagate African violets this way.Fill the container with lukewarm water, and place plastic wrap over the opening.When you see roots begin to develop after a few weeks, you can add a tiny drop of liquid fertilizer to the water if you want to, but it’s not a necessary step.You probably won’t need to move your tiny new African violet to a larger container for a while.New African violets do not grow quickly, so don’t worry if yours seems to be taking its time.Just continue watering regularly and giving your plant access to 10 hours of light each day.Part of what makes African violets so easy is that they do well in normal household conditions.In addition to starting seeds and taking cuttings, you can propagate African violets through division.The advantage to dividing African violets over other methods of propagation is that you get a healthy, mature plant from the start; you won’t need to wait 6 to 9 months to see blooms.It’s only possible to divide an African violet once the plant has developed multiple crowns.If your African violet only has one crown, you’ll need to use a different method of propagation instead.The first step before beginning to divide your African violet is to water the plant and let it sit for a couple of hours.Ideally, you should be able to gently untangle the roots and pull apart the different foliage clusters.Fill up the containers with African violet potting mix, leaving room for the plant at the top.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

Are African Violets Fast Growing

Are African Violets Fast Growing

These compact, low-growing plants flower several times a year, and they are available in a multitude of leaf forms and colors.Don't be put off by their reputation for difficulty: providing you follow a few simple rules, African violets should thrive indoors.With a little experience, it's possible to keep them in flower nearly all year round and grow them to the size of dinner plates.Regularly check the soil and plant to make sure there is no accumulation of dead leaves.Growing these houseplants is really a matter of balance; you have to make sure that the different factors that go into their cultivation all are weighted against each other.Poor drainage can cause root rot, in which the plant becomes waterlogged and its leaves begin to fall, so make sure that the plant is never allowed to be exposed to standing water for an extended period of time.Do not allow water to contact the leaves to prevent damage, other than light misting.Adult plants occasionally produce small plantlets or shoots from the side.Common signs that a plant is stressed out and needs to be repotted include falling leaves and overcrowding, as well as roots that protrude from the surface of the soil.Today, African violets are available in single and double flowers, in all different colors, and with widely varied leaf shapes.

Where To Buy Yellow African Violets

Where To Buy Yellow African Violets

um zu gewährleisten, dass Verkäufer wissen, wer ihre Zielgruppen sind, damit sie relevante Anzeigen schalten können.Wenn du hier „Nein“ auswählst, werden dir dennoch weiterhin Etsy-Anzeigen angezeigt und dies hat keinen Einfluss auf Etsys eigene Personalisierungstechnologien.

Why Is My African Violet Dying

Why Is My African Violet Dying

Learn the six most common signs your African violet is dying and what you can do to nurse your plant back to health.You choose the perfect decorative pot for your African violet, and it quickly becomes your favorite tabletop centerpiece.Let’s take a look at the six most common signs your African violet is sick, and learn how to nurse your favorite big-bloomed, fuzzy-leafed plant back to health in no time.Give your African violet a good drink, make sure it’s not sitting in direct sunlight, and start a fertilizer routine to nourish your plant.Crown and stem rot is most often caused by over-watering—the most common way new growers accidentally kill their African violets.Burnt, dry, or crumbly leaf tips are a sure sign your African violet lacks moisture.Professional Tip: If you keep your home cool and dry, consider putting your African violet on a humidity tray.If it’s been a while since you watered your African violet, give it a good drink; its leaves should spring back to life within 24 hours.While some air circulation is good for the plant, African violets don’t do well when positioned directly in front of heating or air-conditioning vents.Professional Tip: If you’re on a budget, you can make a plant-safe mildew solution with baking soda, water, and a spray bottle.To encourage healing and new growth, move your African violet to a room that receives ample indirect sunlight or hang a sheer curtain between your light source and your plant to help diffuse the direct rays.Repot your plant, use fresh potting mix , and try a ta fungicide or homemade solution to ward off the existing mold.&nb.Move your plant to a location with indirect sunlight or use a sheer curtain to diffuse harsh rays.For continued success, explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other African violet plant lovers in our Facebook group.

What Season Are African Violets Available

What Season Are African Violets Available

To grow large, keep disbudded for 4-6 months Green or variegated foliage.Hybrid African Violets from Russia & Ukraine Unless grown for 'show' standards grow about 12" in diameter We are the source for these latest varieties Double, star-shaped, 'fantasy' blooms Use a 4" to 5" pot when plant is mature.Saintpaulia species The 'original' violets found in Africa Ancestors or our modern hybrids Very tolerant and easy to care for Click on images to view online listing Help preserve an endangered species.Discovered in 1892 by Baron von St Paul (hence the botanical name), many species can still be found growing in the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania and Kenya.Though their geography is tropical, most species reside in the mountains, at altitude, and under the cover of other plants.This makes African violets ideal for the indoor home garden or window–requiring only moderate (“room”) temperatures and light.Though many of the native Saintpaulia are now threatened by loss of habitat, millions of their modern descendants are grown throughout the world in homes of collectors and hobbyists.As you’ll see by viewing our site and catalog, modern African violet hybrids can be spectacular and very different from the simple species first discovered more than a century ago.Pictured at left: Olive with a ‘Best in Show’ exhibit, ‘Opera’s il Straniero’.With proper culture, actual plant size usually is much smaller in practice.Because these are small-growing plants and have small root systems, never use a pot bigger than 2 1/2″ in diameter, even less for the smallest varieties.‘Chimera’ varieties are violets for which propagation by leaf cuttings will not produce plantlets identical to the original plant.These are typically the “pinwheel” blossomed varieties that show broad center and side stripes of different colors.Variegation on leaf chimeras is very rare and is completely immune to changes in temperature, environment and age.Trailing African violets are perhaps the easiest to grow and bloom, especially for the novice.These violets freely produce extra crowns without sacrificing appearance or bloom–in fact, this increases the potential bloom!Saintpaulia species are the African violets that all modern hybrids trace the ancestry to.If growing under artificial lights, place a two-tube florescent fixture about 12-18″ above plants for 12-13 hours each day.If growing under artificial lights, place a two-tube florescent fixture about 12-18″ above plants for 12-13 hours each day.A ‘balanced’ formula is best (relatively equal amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium).A ‘balanced’ formula is best (relatively equal amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium).Most standard African violets, grown as a houseplant, will require a 4-5″ pot at maturity.We grow our plants in a renovated barn, circa 1900, with an attached glasshouse and other buildings.We specialize in African violets and their relatives (gesneriads), and other plants suitable for the indoor home environment.Most are of a manageable size (can be grown on a windowsill or light stand), and many will bloom readily in the home.Our “plant care” pages contain much useful information, including “how to” lessons, and a FAQ (frequently asked questions) library.If you’ve purchased a plant from us, and are having difficulties growing it, or simply need more information on its care, we can always be reached by email or phone during business hours.We offer incentives to join (a free plant with an AVSA membership) and encourage members to participate and exhibit (coupons for show winners).

What Do African Violets Need To Bloom

What Do African Violets Need To Bloom

Find out all the reasons yours may be refusing to flower and how to encourage blooms and reblooming throughout the year.You’ll know the light is insufficient if the plant doesn’t bloom, the leaves grow in elongated shapes, or crowns get leggy.Soil | Use a commercial mix intended for African violets combined with perlite, or make your own.Temperature | 65-75°F (18-24°C) Humidity | 40-50 percent | I keep some of my violets sitting above plant trays filled with water.No matter what season or weather is going on outside, there are always a few plants loaded with beautiful blooms inside.These are my top tips for ensuring that your African violets not only produce flowers but rebloom again and again throughout the year.Genetics help determine bloomability (volume, size, colour, frequency), but, if you have a healthy plant, it’s very likely yours can be encouraged to flower too.In addition to the list of reasons why African violets may not bloom, I have answered Frequently Asked Questions here.And, as always, this is gardening, not magic, and plants are living things, which means changes take time.How to Grow African Violets from Leaf Cuttings | easy way to get free plants.The key is to get bright light in the morning or afternoon without excessive heat or intense sun.Signs of inadequate light include stretched leaf stems and small adult leaves.In winter, I keep mine at an east-facing window, and set them back as summer warms up.Be sure to rotate your pots a quarter turn every few days to avoid leaning.Relative humidity levels of 40 to 50% are good for many plants including African violets.Watch out for dry air caused by indoor heating systems.If your fertilizer label shows a monthly dose, reduce it down to a weekly amount and add that to your watering can.If the soil pH level is too high or too low, the plant cannot properly take up the available nutrients.You are unlikely to deal with a major pH problem with a houseplant, but keep it in mind as it is key for all plants.Common ingredients include sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, and perlite.Because harvesting peat requires the destruction of irreplaceable carbon-sequestering ecosystems (bogs), the search for sustainable alternatives is underway.How to Repot African Violets has everything you need to move your plants to the correct size pots.Unless a problem is really simple to solve and does not require buying anything, I’m much more likely to toss the plant than treat it.It’s just not worth the risk of affecting/infecting my other plants and I like to keep my indoor and outdoor gardening as simple as possible.This is one big drawback to African violets: they rarely grow in good formation.Instead, they create extra crowns, suckers, or other strange leaf formations.With good genes and the right growing conditions, you can expect flowers every 2-6 months (unless you have a genetic dud).2) Sit your potted African violet in a saucer of warm water.One popular choice is a 20-14-13 fertilizer intended for orchids or fish emulsion.There a general rule in gardening that we try to never disturb a plant while flowering because that can hasten or halt blooming.Use the right soil and only choose a larger pot if the roots have reached the edges of the current one.Keep in mind that the current conditions have (collectively) enabled blooming, so don’t stray from that if you want the flowers to continue.

Where To Buy African Violets Gold Coast

Where To Buy African Violets Gold Coast

One mature, this simply means repotting the plant with some fresh soil, into the same size pot.For example, in an extreme case, where a plant has a 2″ neck, we would need to remove 2″ from the bottom of the root ball.Since a bottom portion of the root ball has been removed, the violet can now be pushed lower into the pot.The objective is to lower the plant enough so that the lowest row of leaves is even with the pot rim (i.e.

How Long Does It Take For African Violets To Root In Water

How Long Does It Take For African Violets To Root In Water

Propagating your houseplants is an easy, inexpensive way to multiply your collection and grow thoughtful gifts for others.If your African violet appears to be struggling, nurse it back to health before attempting to propagate.The best leaves for propagation are fully developed but not showing any signs of poor health or aging (brown spots, holes, curling edges).We recommend selecting a few more leaves than you’re hoping to multiply to boost your chances of success.Using a sharp-bladed knife or pruning shears, cut the stem at a 45-degree angle down to about 1½ inch.Slicing the stem, or petiole, diagonally increases the surface area available for roots to sprout.Add 1 teaspoon of the liquid promoter into the soil before planting to reduce time to new roots.Use plant tags or another small, firm item to prop the leaf upright.Overly dry soil can give you a hard time creating “greenhouse-like” conditions in Step 4.Place the plant near a bright window but away from direct sunlight or other heat sources.The plastic will allow light to permeate and capture the moisture in the soil to create a mini-greenhouse effect.If the inside of your mini greenhouse appears dry, check the soil.At this point, they simply aren’t strong enough to be separated from the mother leaf.Prepare a small, well-draining plastic pot with African violet soil and a little propagation booster, and then plant as you would any other houseplant.In a few more months (around 6-7 from the original propagation), your plant is ready to move to a traditional African violet pot and start producing beautiful blooms.If you’re a houseplant lover, chances are you’ve propagated plant babies in water.Pull a piece of cellophane taut over the top and secure.Make sure you place the stem in water immediately after cutting; African violet leaves will start to harden up within a few minutes of exposure to air.Wait until the baby plant is about half-an-inch big and move to a small pot, following the directions in Step 5 above.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .

What Are Optimara African Violets

What Are Optimara African Violets

This will alter both the pH and the electrical conductivity of the soil, thereby diminishing your African Violet's ability to absorb water and nutrients.By providing the correctamount of water, a good self-watering device will greatly reduce the chances of getting any of the deadly fungi which cause plants to rot.Finally, there are some self-watering devices which, while providing the benefits already mentioned, will also increase the humidity in the area immediately around your Violets.All of the above self-watering devices are available online at the Selective Gardener, a mail order supplier that specializes in plant care products made specifically for African Violets.In such circumstances, an African Violets will stop flowering and its leaves begin to turn yellow.If you have access to a light meter, the correct luminosity for African Violets is 10,000 to 12,000 lux, or about 900 to 1100 foot candles.Also, it is important to rotate your African Violets so that they receive an equal amount of sunlight on all sides.If African Violets are not rotated in this manner, they will begin to bend towards the light and grow larger on the side closest to the window.Blue light is necessary for photosynthesis to occur and, thus, is vital for the development of green leaves and the production of plant carbohydrates.If the African Violet is too close to the grow light, it will begin to develop symptoms similar to those resulting from too much sunlight, i.e., leaf scorch.Finally, you should be aware of a condition peculiar to African Violets which are cultivated under grow lights.While not all African Violets are sensitive to this condition, those that are will develop leaves which are distinctly lighter on those areas directly exposed to the light.In terms of temperature, humidity and other factors of air quality, African Violets thrive in an environment which most people would consider pleasant.However, in case you are one of those people who thrive in otherwise unhealthy circumstances, you will need to know a little about the conditions preferred by African Violets.In fact, some African Violet hybrids require fluctuations of as much as 10 degrees in order to produce optimal flowering.Therefore, depending on how long your African Violet has been exposed to excessive heat, you may need to decrease the frequency with which it receives water.To gauge the impact on water, it will help to know that the rate of evaporation from leaves drops by half with each decrease of 20 degrees F.While excessive heat will cause your African Violets to suffer, they are not nearly as deadly as cold temperatures.Moreover, cooler temperatures leave African Violets vulnerable to such deadly pathogens as Crown Rot, especially when accompanied by excessive moisture.Place your African Violet in a clear plastic bag and close the top with a wire twist.At this time, once you have removed it from the bag, it should be safe to return your African Violet to its normal watering and fertilizing schedule.In their native habitat, in the Usambara Mountains of East Africa, the relative humidity is generally about 70 to 80 percent.If the level of humidity is much less than this, an African Violet's transpiration rate will be greater than its ability to absorb water.As a consequence, buds will fail to open, plant growth will be slow, and leaves will begin to appear dry and shriveled.Another way to increase humidity is to use a self-watering device, such as the Watermaid, which relies on capillary matting to draw water into the soil.Because humidity is so important to African Violets, good air circulation also becomes a vital concern.Even when the overall air temperature is within acceptable limits, a cold draft may eventually send an African Violet into shock.Depending on the precise source, gas or chemical fumes can result in pale leaves which are smaller than normal and flowers which turn brown and drop off.One way to determine if gas or chemical fumes are present has been suggested by the African Violet Society of America.They assert that a young tomato plant, when in the presence of gas or chemical fumes, will begin to sag within a few hours.

How Often Do African Violets Need To Be Repotted

How Often Do African Violets Need To Be Repotted

One mature, this simply means repotting the plant with some fresh soil, into the same size pot.For example, in an extreme case, where a plant has a 2″ neck, we would need to remove 2″ from the bottom of the root ball.Since a bottom portion of the root ball has been removed, the violet can now be pushed lower into the pot.The objective is to lower the plant enough so that the lowest row of leaves is even with the pot rim (i.e.

Do African Violets Like Terracotta Pots

Do African Violets Like Terracotta Pots

As summer winds down here in Iowa, you might be shifting your focus back to the care of your houseplants.Right now those pretty African violet blossoms on our garden center shelves are looking particularly lovely, and yet their reputation has some folks hesitating.They require a little more attentive care than other plants, but we think their beautiful blossoms are worth the extra effort.If you’re up for the challenge, we’ve prepared a guide to help you keep your treasured African violets blooming.We’ve noted their peculiarities, and if you follow these guidelines, yours should reward you with plenty of blossoms.Or, set the pot in the bottom of your sink or in a baking dish with about one inch of room temperature water.Terra Cotta is ideal for African violets because the porous material allows the roots to breath better and prevents the soil from staying too wet.You can also get African Violet specific pots that have a terra cotta sleeve you plant in, and a water reservoir.Make sure its leaves don’t touch the glass—this may transfer the outdoor chill to the plant.Their delicate fuzzy leaves and pretty purple, pink, or white blossoms are worth the trouble.Once you’ve got your African violet collection thriving, you can gift them to friends and pass on your expertise.Keep it warm, 65-70 degrees Water from the bottom when the soil is dry (set the pot in 1″ room temperature water for 1 hour) The pot size should be 1/3 plant width Use African Violet specific soil Feed every 2-3 weeks with African Violet fertilizer (set a reminder on your phone!).Stop by our garden center to browse our beautiful selection of African violet varieties and supplies.We can get you set up with the right plant and the right tools to make caring for your African violet as fun, easy and convenient as possible.

Is African Violet Plant Poisonous To Dogs

Is African Violet Plant Poisonous To Dogs

You may want to prevent your dog from ingesting the plants, however, as any unfamiliar material that is taken internally may cause an allergic reaction or diarrhea.If your dog manages to eat an African violet or two, watch it closely for signs of vomiting or diarrhea.If it appears to have an upset stomach, withhold food for 24 hours to give its system time to expel the foreign matter safely.If the dog shows any signs of distress, such as excessive salivation, panting or lethargy, take it to the veterinarian immediately.Your veterinarian will most likely induce vomiting if he believes the dog has ingested something poisonous along with the African violet.

What Does The Flower Violet Symbolize

What Does The Flower Violet Symbolize

According to Greek mythology, violets were created when one of Artemis’ nymphs, who had all sworn to stay maidens, was being pursued by her twin brother, Apollo.The violet also has roots in Christianity and represents the modesty of the Virgin Mary.The violet also represents spiritual wisdom, faithfulness and humility which are meanings that can be seen depicted in religious works of art.It is a purple quartz that was used by the Ancient Greeks to ward off the tempting powers of Bacchus (also known as Dionysus), the god of intoxication and ecstasy.Despite its history of being an exclusive gemstone only to be worn by the elite, the amethyst can be found all over the world, particularly in Brazil.They prefer not to follow conventional paths and are creative thinkers who thrive off of providing fresh and original solutions to problems both personally and professionally.Although Aquarians may come off as detached, they are great communicators and like to assess others before investing in a relationship.Although generous and caring, they expect the same treatment in return, which can make them feel insecure at times.

How To Grow An African Violet Indoors

How To Grow An African Violet Indoors

These compact, low-growing plants flower several times a year, and they are available in a multitude of leaf forms and colors.Don't be put off by their reputation for difficulty: providing you follow a few simple rules, African violets should thrive indoors.With a little experience, it's possible to keep them in flower nearly all year round and grow them to the size of dinner plates.Regularly check the soil and plant to make sure there is no accumulation of dead leaves.Growing these houseplants is really a matter of balance; you have to make sure that the different factors that go into their cultivation all are weighted against each other.Poor drainage can cause root rot, in which the plant becomes waterlogged and its leaves begin to fall, so make sure that the plant is never allowed to be exposed to standing water for an extended period of time.Do not allow water to contact the leaves to prevent damage, other than light misting.Adult plants occasionally produce small plantlets or shoots from the side.Common signs that a plant is stressed out and needs to be repotted include falling leaves and overcrowding, as well as roots that protrude from the surface of the soil.Today, African violets are available in single and double flowers, in all different colors, and with widely varied leaf shapes.

African Violets For Sale Nyc

African Violets For Sale Nyc

X X Rectangular Wooden Planter Box With Liner, Foliage: Salal, Acacia (Or Sprigs Of Dried Filler), Aussie Pine (Or Other Seasonal Evergreens), Spray Leucadendron (Separated), Red Roses, Red Mini Carnations, Green Spray Mums, Natural Pine Cones On Wooden Picks, Pheasant Feathers.

Where To Buy African Violets In Melbourne

Where To Buy African Violets In Melbourne

This guide will teach you everything you need to know to pick the best retailer, the perfect plant, and the right tools to keep your African violet happy and healthy for years to come.Nursery staff at these businesses are knowledgeable and can help answer your pressing questions and concerns.Placement: African violets like indirect light and will burn in direct sunlight.Color: African violets come in a wide range of vibrant hues, giving you the creative freedom to select one (or a dozen!).Check out our guide to African violet color pairing for artistic inspiration.Check out 5 Growing Tips to Consider Before You Buy an African Violet to learn more about ongoing care.At African Violet Resource Center, we offer the highest-quality tools and products to keep your plant happy for the long haul.Plants take up nutrients from the soil as they grow and fertilizer replaces what they’ve depleted.But African violets’ delicate root systems are easily scorched by conventional fertilizers.Our gentle plant food is specially formulated to provide key elements for growth, improve nutrient uptake, and correct soil deficiencies.Instead of guessing and suffocating your plant, use a soil moisture meter to determine when it’s time for a drink.These flowers are easy to propagate (meaning you only need to figure out where to buy African violets once!).They boost your mood, beautify your space, and reward you for your loving care by growing strong and healthy.Our book Houseplants for Millennials is an easy-to-understand guide to growing happy, healthy plant babies.Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned grower, African Violet Resource Center has everything you need to help your plant grow vibrant and strong.Explore our other articles, visit our online shop, and connect with other houseplant lovers in our Facebook group to learn everything you need to know about this rewarding hobby! .