CATEGORIES

Black-Eyed Susans

Black-eyed Susan Vine Over Winter Uk

Black-eyed Susan Vine Over Winter Uk

Positive On May 12, 2019, Marysland from East New Market, MD wrote: I love this plant at my NC cottage zone 7b-8a .It climbed the deck and also spread around the ground like a groundcover and seeing it's happy blooms at Christmas just amazed me!Negative On Jan 7, 2019, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote: Here in Jalisco (USDA Z11, Sunset Z24), this is a garden thug, self-sowing aggressively.Positive On Jan 14, 2018, cheyotto from Rockland, MA (Zone 6b) wrote: Love this plant but whatever you do, DO NOT OVER FERTILIZE.I just cut off the green pods and let them dry in a bowl in front of a sunny window.Positive On Feb 16, 2016, beachwoman from South Kingstown, RI (Zone 5b) wrote: I was lucky to receive a large potted yellow Thunbergia balata last May.After placing it in a sunny spot on the front deck of my South Kingstown, RI home, I was rewarded with gorgeous yellow flowers all summer and well into fall.A few times during the summer I cut pieces, dipped them in rooting medium, and spread them around the yard.Positive On Jun 21, 2015, elainewhite74 from Herndon, VA (Zone 7a) wrote: I've been growing this vine from two balconies on the front of my house for the past two years.Very fast grower, by the end of the season last year, they covered the entire rail and hung down at least eight feet!Showy little yellow flowers bloom through out the season and provide a riot of color, my neighbors are always commenting.Positive On Sep 15, 2014, cnoteboom from Battle Creek, MI wrote: I bought them from a catalog and they have grown like crazy on my covered porch here in Michigan.They live an outdoor "garden room" where there's lots of light, but the temperature has stayed mostly in the 50's this month.I have a heater in the room that comes on automatically if the temp drops below 40 degrees, but it looks like this plant doesn't mind cool nights.Positive On Mar 19, 2012, amelliso from Lubbock, TX (Zone 7b) wrote: Planted a 3" pot in spring 2010.Positive On Jan 31, 2011, Sonnenblume from Aurora, CO (Zone 5b) wrote: I bought a potted "annual" plant with the label Thunbergia Alata late this summer at the local supermarket .After blooming a short while longer it started to dry out and drop most of its leaves so I thought, oh boy, maybe this is not going to work.I moved it into the warmest sunniest room in the house and watered it regularly but did not notice it much for a while, until new fresh green leaves started growing perhaps in December.Its a good choice for Colorado as long as you pamper it inside for the winter, otherwise treat it as an annual.The yellow flowers with the dark dot in the middle are cute and tender looking when they bloom.Neutral On Jan 22, 2011, cece71 from Richmond, CA wrote: Our beautiful Blackeyed Susan Vine is suddenly dead.We have lived in our house for 2 1/2 years and have enjoyed the back "wall", a 10 foot fence/lattice, covered with the Blackeyed Susan vines.With purple Morning Glories overlaying it this wall has been a riot of golden color in the summer months.Neutral On Sep 13, 2010, bilottashii from Santa Fe, TX wrote: I planted seeds this past spring to replace the vines I lost during the freeze last winter.Positive On Jul 13, 2010, DisHammerhand from Fontana, CA wrote: When I first saw this plant I fell in love with it.it really took off this year and now my porch is sheltered in a blanket of fuzzy leaves and happy orange flowers.Positive On Oct 22, 2009, uncletim1958 from Clearfield, PA wrote: our black eyed suan grew so nice this yr our first time we had one now that the frost got it will it come back next year any one know if it will.Positive On Oct 13, 2009, Maggs06 from Garden Grove, CA wrote: My backyard backs right up against the front of an elementry school.Positive On Mar 12, 2009, gilbert2 from Van Nuys, CA wrote: Fast grower, and great wall covering, the only negative is the invasiveness.Positive On Oct 29, 2008, dimar7a from Quincy, MA wrote: we tried this plant from seed this year for first time,had great luck.we put about 9 seedlings in a 2 gallon pot.it was slow to start, but buy mid july it really started to show alot of flowers,it,s the end of oct.

How To Grow Black Eyed Susans From Seeds

How To Grow Black Eyed Susans From Seeds

Find mixtures for your region, or for special uses such as dry areas, partial shade, attracting animals, low growing, and more.

How To Grow Black-eyed Susan Climber Seeds

How To Grow Black-eyed Susan Climber Seeds

The Black-Eyed Susan vine (Thunbergia Alata) is a tropical plant that originally came from parts of Africa, Asia, and Madagascar.The only real similarity between the two is that both bear flowers with dark centers surrounded by bright yellow or orange petals.The dark green leaves are arrow-shaped and get up to 3” in size, and the vines bloom profusely from the early summer through the fall with five-petaled flowers in the familiar yellow and orange, but are also available in salmon, rose and apricot.Simply collect the dried seed pods from the vine after it has bloomed and store them in a plastic bag.Take part of the vine that is already low to the ground and bend it so the last six to eight inches can be covered with earth without removing it from the plant.Once established, this vine can be trimmed and shaped (lightly) during the growing season, but any heavier pruning should be done in the early spring before the new growth starts.Always have the climbing structure (fence, trellis, pole) in place before you plant, since you don’t want to disturb the seedlings by having to dig and construct by them.The Black-Eyed Susan vine is a rapidly growing climber or ground cover that will ramble and twine up trellises and through fences, producing masses of colorful blooms and rich green foliage.

Are Black Eyed Susans A Vine

Are Black Eyed Susans A Vine

Common Name Black-Eyed Susan vine, clockvine Botanical Name Thunbergia alata Family Acanthaceae Plant Type Flowering vine, annual or perennial Mature Size 3 to 8 ft.

How To Trim Back Black Eyed Susans

How To Trim Back Black Eyed Susans

Black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia) add a dramatic swash of color to summer garden beds, borders and planters.Spread a 2- to 4-inch layer of mulch over the black-eyed Susan bed once the ground begins to freeze, typically after three to four fall frosts have occurred.

Black Eyed Susans For Sale

Black Eyed Susans For Sale

the plant looked like a dried piece of root with some leaves with no soil upon arrival.Store in a cool place and keep roots moist and covered with plastic until they can be planted.We dip the roots in tera-sorb silicone gel to retain ample moisture for transit and surround with plastic.With alternating, primarily basal leaves 10 to 18 cm in length and covered in thin hair.On the other hand, large-scale breeding has resulted in a variety of sizes and colors, including oranges, shades of red, bright yellow, and browns.Both of which are Royal Horticultural Society's Garden Merit Award, winners.Gloriosa daisy is a tetraploid variant of the black-eyed Susan with substantially more giant heads than that of the wild species.A balanced soil pH, as well as full sunlight to moderate shade setting, are ideal for growing the plant.Another beautiful flower, Echinacea purpurea, which has a purple color, comes from this plant category.The optimum temperature for seed germination is 70° F.

When Do You Divide Black Eyed Susans

When Do You Divide Black Eyed Susans

The cheery yellow blooms of black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia fulgida) enliven sunny garden spots and beckon pollinators.The spent flower heads produce seeds that many backyard birds relish, including goldfinches that clasp the swaying stems as they eat.When you’re ready to lift the clumps of black-eyed Susans, press a sharp shovel or spading fork into the ground all around your plants, about 6 inches from the outside leaf edges.Separate plant sections that have three to five healthy shoots each by pulling them apart with your hand or by cutting them with a sterilized knife or garden shears.After you’ve separated your black-eyed Susans, plant them immediately in the soil you prepared ahead of time so their roots never dry out.They flourish in full sun (at least six hours each day) and well-draining soil, fertilized in spring according to soil-test results when the new growth emerges.

Can I Grow Black Eyed Susans From Seed

Can I Grow Black Eyed Susans From Seed

Find mixtures for your region, or for special uses such as dry areas, partial shade, attracting animals, low growing, and more.

Do Black Eyed Susans Come In Different Colors

Do Black Eyed Susans Come In Different Colors

Valued for its large, sturdy, daisylike flowers with dropping petals, this prairie native will spread easily in good soil and full sun.It used to be that rosy purple or white were the only choices in flower color, but recent hybrids have introduced yellow, orange, burgundy, cream, and shades in between.

Black Eyed Susan Preakness Drink

Black Eyed Susan Preakness Drink

This modern black-eyed Susan cocktail features vodka and bourbon shaken with peach schnapps, orange juice, and sour mix.

Black-eyed Susans For Sale Near Me

Black-eyed Susans For Sale Near Me

the plant looked like a dried piece of root with some leaves with no soil upon arrival.Store in a cool place and keep roots moist and covered with plastic until they can be planted.We dip the roots in tera-sorb silicone gel to retain ample moisture for transit and surround with plastic.With alternating, primarily basal leaves 10 to 18 cm in length and covered in thin hair.On the other hand, large-scale breeding has resulted in a variety of sizes and colors, including oranges, shades of red, bright yellow, and browns.Gloriosa daisy is a tetraploid variant of the black-eyed Susan with substantially more giant heads than that of the wild species.A balanced soil pH, as well as full sunlight to moderate shade setting, are ideal for growing the plant.Another beautiful flower, Echinacea purpurea, which has a purple color, comes from this plant category.The optimum temperature for seed germination is 70° F.

Can You Split Black Eyed Susans

Can You Split Black Eyed Susans

The cheery yellow blooms of black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia fulgida) enliven sunny garden spots and beckon pollinators.The spent flower heads produce seeds that many backyard birds relish, including goldfinches that clasp the swaying stems as they eat.When you’re ready to lift the clumps of black-eyed Susans, press a sharp shovel or spading fork into the ground all around your plants, about 6 inches from the outside leaf edges.Separate plant sections that have three to five healthy shoots each by pulling them apart with your hand or by cutting them with a sterilized knife or garden shears.After you’ve separated your black-eyed Susans, plant them immediately in the soil you prepared ahead of time so their roots never dry out.They flourish in full sun (at least six hours each day) and well-draining soil, fertilized in spring according to soil-test results when the new growth emerges.

Why Are My Black Eyed Susans Not Blooming

Why Are My Black Eyed Susans Not Blooming

Up until this summer, they bloomed profusely and really made a statement in our yard.Or put compost or leaf litter as fertilizer around the plants?I use Flowertone because it is organic, slow release and only needs to be put down once in the spring.As far as the leaves turning black, I would need a photo to accurately answer your question.I would dig out the ones that had the blackish leaves and do not plant more Black Eyed-Susans in these areas.Linda K.

How To Grow Black Eyed Susan Vine

How To Grow Black Eyed Susan Vine

Botanical Name Thunbergia alata Common Names Black-eyed Susan vine, clock vine, bright eyes Plant Type Perennial flowering vine (usually grown as an annual) Mature Size 3–8 feet tall, 3–6 feet wide Sun Exposure Full sun to part shade Soil Type Rich loam, medium moisture, well-draining Soil pH 6.8 to 7.7 (slightly acidic to slightly alkaline) Bloom Time Summer to fall Flower Color Red, orange, yellow, white Hardiness Zones 10 to 11 (USDA) Native Area Eastern Africa.A lattice or metal fence makes a good choice for weaving your vines into a living wall, but these plants will clamber over just about anything—from a mailbox pole to an old tree stump.With their quick growth habit and sprawling nature, black-eyed Susan vines can overtake nearby plants and consequently are often grown solo.Morning glories are often used for this purpose, particularly the purple varieties that provide a nice color combination.You will get the most flowers and the healthiest plants if you grow your black-eyed Susan vines in full sun (at least six hours of direct sunlight on most days).The exception is in hot, dry climates, where growing the plants in partial afternoon shade is recommended.Black-eyed Susan vines grown indoors may flower in the winter if they get ample sun and the temperature doesn't fall below 60 degrees Fahrenheit.Humidity is usually not an issue for these plants, but they can struggle in very dry conditions, so make sure the soil remains moist.'African Sunset' has burgundy centers surrounded by red, ivory, and darker shades of apricot and salmon.Black-eyed Susan vines don't like having their roots disturbed, so it helps if you start the seed in peat or paper pots that will biodegrade when planted with the seedling.Black-eyed Susan vine isn't prone to many problems, particularly if the plant has plenty of sun, water, and air circulation.

Is Black Eyed Susan Vine Invasive

Is Black Eyed Susan Vine Invasive

Botanical Name Thunbergia alata Common Name Black-Eyed Susan vine Plant Type Flowering vine, annual or perennial Mature Size 3 to 8 ft.

Are Black Eyed Susans Related To Sunflowers

Are Black Eyed Susans Related To Sunflowers

Rudbeckia hirta, commonly called black-eyed Susan, is a North American flowering plant in the sunflower family, native to Eastern and Central North America and naturalized in the Western part of the continent as well as in China.The name “triloba” comes from the dark green, somewhat hairy basal leaves that are divided into three oval parts.Grow Details: Black Eyed Susans are extremely hardy plants, and very tolerant of different conditions.

How To Grow Black-eyed Susans

How To Grow Black-eyed Susans

Find mixtures for your region, or for special uses such as dry areas, partial shade, attracting animals, low growing, and more.

Can Black Eyed Susans Grow In Shade

Can Black Eyed Susans Grow In Shade

This is one of the few perennials that will give you late season color in moderate shade, though it also grows fine in full sun.In fact, I’ve seen R.

What Bugs Do Black-eyed Susans Attract

What Bugs Do Black-eyed Susans Attract

But to bees, which see in the ultraviolet spectrum, the blooms of black-eyed susans reflect and absorb UV light so that the flower looks like a dark circle surrounded by a bright ring on the outer parts of the petals.Their caterpillars will use leaf and petal cuttings from the flower to decorate their backs and help hide them while they feed and grow on the plant — and for good reason.Jagged ambush bugs also may lie in wait for bees, flies, aphids and other soft-bodied insects that come to drink nectar at these plants.Now imagine a black-eyed susan being planted in a garden with wild bergamot, butterfly milkweed and fragrant (anise) hyssop, each of which have their own complicated set of relationships.These intricate systems — supported by a handful of plants — can provide a thriving habitat for a wide array of native insects.

When Should I Cut Back My Black Eyed Susans

When Should I Cut Back My Black Eyed Susans

Black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia) add a dramatic swash of color to summer garden beds, borders and planters.Spread a 2- to 4-inch layer of mulch over the black-eyed Susan bed once the ground begins to freeze, typically after three to four fall frosts have occurred.In fall, you can cut this perennial back to 2 inches above the soil line if the plant is diseased or you consider the dead stems unattractive.In fall, you can cut this perennial back to 2 inches above the soil line if the plant is diseased or you consider the dead stems unattractive.

Black Eyed Susan Indian Summer

Black Eyed Susan Indian Summer

‘Indian Summer’ is a standout among a sea of Black-eyed Susans because of its extra-large, golden yellow flowerheads.PropagationStart seeds indoors in spring or direct sow in the garden after the frost-free date.ProblemsFairly trouble-free, but watch for aphids, powdery mildew, smut, and leaf spots.

Where Can I Buy Black Eyed Susan Vine

Where Can I Buy Black Eyed Susan Vine

Botanical Name Thunbergia alata Common Name Black-Eyed Susan vine Plant Type Flowering vine, annual or perennial Mature Size 3 to 8 ft.

Are Black Eyed Susans Native To Ohio

Are Black Eyed Susans Native To Ohio

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits.You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.Ask Mr.

How To Trim Black Eyed Susans

How To Trim Black Eyed Susans

Black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia) add a dramatic swash of color to summer garden beds, borders and planters.Spread a 2- to 4-inch layer of mulch over the black-eyed Susan bed once the ground begins to freeze, typically after three to four fall frosts have occurred.In fall, you can cut this perennial back to 2 inches above the soil line if the plant is diseased or you consider the dead stems unattractive.In fall, you can cut this perennial back to 2 inches above the soil line if the plant is diseased or you consider the dead stems unattractive.