Black Eyed Susan Vine Safe For Dogs

Black Eyed Susan Vine Safe For Dogs
Edward R. Forte October 21, 2021

Black-Eyed Susans

Black Eyed Susan Vine Safe For Dogs

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Plants Poisonous to Cats, Dogs and other Pets

Many homeowners are surprised to discover that common landscaping plants can make their pets sick.Colorful, softly textured plants that are alluring at the nursery may contain poisons.Some of those toxins are harmless to human beings but can kill cats, dogs, and other animals.Here are a list of the most common landscape plants and the parts that are toxic to housepets:.Cherry trees – eating the leaves and twigs can be fatal – they release cyanide when eaten.Since dogs and cats spend so much time in contact with the ground, they are especially sensitive to chemicals in the environment.Their lower weight means that even small amounts of toxins can be harmful.For pet friendly landscaping, organic fertilizers and natural weed controls are also important. .

Black-Eyed Susan Vines: Plant Care & Growing Guide

Botanical Name Thunbergia alata Common Names Black-eyed Susan vine, clock vine, bright eyes Plant Type Perennial flowering vine (usually grown as an annual) Mature Size 3–8 feet tall, 3–6 feet wide Sun Exposure Full sun to part shade Soil Type Rich loam, medium moisture, well-draining Soil pH 6.8 to 7.7 (slightly acidic to slightly alkaline) Bloom Time Summer to fall Flower Color Red, orange, yellow, white Hardiness Zones 10 to 11 (USDA) Native Area Eastern Africa.Although these vines don't like sitting in soggy soil, they also don't like being hot and dry.Black-eyed Susan vines grown indoors may flower in the winter if they get ample sun and the temperature doesn't fall below 60 degrees Fahrenheit.Humidity is usually not an issue for these plants, but they can struggle in very dry conditions, so make sure the soil remains moist.Black-eyed Susan vines grow quickly and bloom repeatedly throughout the summer.So they will need a light feeding every four to six weeks with a complete fertilizer to keep them growing well.Varieties of Black-Eyed Susan Vine.'Susie Mix' produces flowers in yellow, orange, and white.Growing From Seeds.Plant the seeds about 1/4 inch deep, and expect them to germinate within two to three weeks.Black-eyed Susan vine isn't prone to many problems, particularly if the plant has plenty of sun, water, and air circulation. .

Black-eyed Susan Vine, Thunbergia alata – Wisconsin Horticulture

Black-eyed Susan vine is commonly grown in the Midwest as a season annual to provide color in a vertical setting.Seeds are often produced late in the season.The fruit resembles a bird’s head with a round base and a long ‘beak’.Seed can be sown directly where the plants are to be grown once soil temperature reaches 60F in the spring, but transplants give better results in the short growing season of the upper Midwest.Plant near the trellis, fence, or other support structure, 14-16” apart.Plants grown in containers can be overwintered indoors in a warm, very bright room.‘Bright Eyes’ – has all white flowers.Lemon A-Peel™ – has bright yellow flowers with a very dark center.‘Orange Wonder’ – all bright orange without the dark center.‘Superstar Orange’ – has extra large, bright orange flowers.‘Susie’ mix – includes orange, yellow and white flowers with or without contrasting dark eyes. .

Is Your Landscaping Pet-Friendly?

One of the questions I always ask a homeowner before I start designing a landscape is, “Do you have any pets that we need to keep in mind?” My wife and I have three dogs (pictured right) so I know first hand how the wrong landscape can cause problems for you and your pets.Pet-Friendly Plants.Easy Clean Up.Shedding Some Light.If you’re like us and have an older dog that has lost his or her eyesight and hearing (our dog Boss is 17 years old and has problems with both), you can add landscape lighting to help you keep an eye on your pets at night. .

Pet Spring Refresher

Here are some quick spring/summer time refreshers about flowers, fertilizers, insecticides, pesticides, and cleaning products that can cause risk when exposed.Signs of Lily toxicity in cats include: drooling, vomiting, anorexia, lethargy, urinating more frequent (about 24 hours after exposure), then leading to acute renal failure.Iron: Large amounts of this heavy metal could lead to vomiting, bloody diarrhea, and possibly affect on the liver and heart.These products are not likely to target any internal organs or cause failure, however this will cause local tissue damage like oral burns/lesions, burns to the face or body, and could lead to risk of infection if the skin becomes open and exposed.If you suspect your pet has been exposed to a corrosive product: flush the affected area continuously with tepid tap water for 20 minutes and then speak to a trained medical professional. .

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Does Black Eyed Susan Vine Need Full Sun

Does Black Eyed Susan Vine Need Full Sun.

Botanical Name Thunbergia alata Common Names Black-eyed Susan vine, clock vine, bright eyes Plant Type Perennial flowering vine (usually grown as an annual) Mature Size 3–8 feet tall, 3–6 feet wide Sun Exposure Full sun to part shade Soil Type Rich loam, medium moisture, well-draining Soil pH 6.8 to 7.7 (slightly acidic to slightly alkaline) Bloom Time Summer to fall Flower Color Red, orange, yellow, white Hardiness Zones 10 to 11 (USDA) Native Area Eastern Africa.Although these vines don't like sitting in soggy soil, they also don't like being hot and dry.Black-eyed Susan vines grown indoors may flower in the winter if they get ample sun and the temperature doesn't fall below 60 degrees Fahrenheit.Humidity is usually not an issue for these plants, but they can struggle in very dry conditions, so make sure the soil remains moist.Black-eyed Susan vines grow quickly and bloom repeatedly throughout the summer.So they will need a light feeding every four to six weeks with a complete fertilizer to keep them growing well.Varieties of Black-Eyed Susan Vine.'Susie Mix' produces flowers in yellow, orange, and white.Growing From Seeds.Plant the seeds about 1/4 inch deep, and expect them to germinate within two to three weeks.Black-eyed Susan vine isn't prone to many problems, particularly if the plant has plenty of sun, water, and air circulation.

What Do Black Eyed Susans Look Like When They First Come Up

What Do Black Eyed Susans Look Like When They First Come Up.

Members of the aster family, Asteraceae, the "black eye" is named for the dark, brown-purple centers of its daisy-like flower heads.

Black Eyed Susan Vine In Shade

Black Eyed Susan Vine In Shade.

Black-eyed Susan vine is commonly grown in the Midwest as a season annual to provide color in a vertical setting.Seeds are often produced late in the season.The fruit resembles a bird’s head with a round base and a long ‘beak’.Seed can be sown directly where the plants are to be grown once soil temperature reaches 60F in the spring, but transplants give better results in the short growing season of the upper Midwest.Plant near the trellis, fence, or other support structure, 14-16” apart.Plants grown in containers can be overwintered indoors in a warm, very bright room.‘Bright Eyes’ – has all white flowers.Lemon A-Peel™ – has bright yellow flowers with a very dark center.‘Orange Wonder’ – all bright orange without the dark center.‘Superstar Orange’ – has extra large, bright orange flowers.‘Susie’ mix – includes orange, yellow and white flowers with or without contrasting dark eyes.