How To Transplant Black Eyed Susan Vine

How To Transplant Black Eyed Susan Vine
Edward R. Forte October 10, 2021

Black-Eyed Susans

How To Transplant Black Eyed Susan Vine

Botanical Name Thunbergia alata Common Names Black-eyed Susan vine, clock vine, bright eyes Plant Type Perennial flowering vine (usually grown as an annual) Mature Size 3–8 feet tall, 3–6 feet wide Sun Exposure Full sun to part shade Soil Type Rich loam, medium moisture, well-draining Soil pH 6.8 to 7.7 (slightly acidic to slightly alkaline) Bloom Time Summer to fall Flower Color Red, orange, yellow, white Hardiness Zones 10 to 11 (USDA) Native Area Eastern Africa.A lattice or metal fence makes a good choice for weaving your vines into a living wall, but these plants will clamber over just about anything—from a mailbox pole to an old tree stump.With their quick growth habit and sprawling nature, black-eyed Susan vines can overtake nearby plants and consequently are often grown solo.Morning glories are often used for this purpose, particularly the purple varieties that provide a nice color combination.You will get the most flowers and the healthiest plants if you grow your black-eyed Susan vines in full sun (at least six hours of direct sunlight on most days).The exception is in hot, dry climates, where growing the plants in partial afternoon shade is recommended.Black-eyed Susan vines grown indoors may flower in the winter if they get ample sun and the temperature doesn't fall below 60 degrees Fahrenheit.Humidity is usually not an issue for these plants, but they can struggle in very dry conditions, so make sure the soil remains moist.'African Sunset' has burgundy centers surrounded by red, ivory, and darker shades of apricot and salmon.Black-eyed Susan vines don't like having their roots disturbed, so it helps if you start the seed in peat or paper pots that will biodegrade when planted with the seedling.Black-eyed Susan vine isn't prone to many problems, particularly if the plant has plenty of sun, water, and air circulation. .

Black-eyed Susan Vine, Thunbergia alata – Wisconsin Horticulture

Black-eyed Susan vine is commonly grown in the Midwest as a season annual to provide color in a vertical setting.Seeds are often produced late in the season.The fruit resembles a bird’s head with a round base and a long ‘beak’.Seed can be sown directly where the plants are to be grown once soil temperature reaches 60F in the spring, but transplants give better results in the short growing season of the upper Midwest.Plant near the trellis, fence, or other support structure, 14-16” apart.Plants grown in containers can be overwintered indoors in a warm, very bright room.‘Bright Eyes’ – has all white flowers.Lemon A-Peel™ – has bright yellow flowers with a very dark center.‘Orange Wonder’ – all bright orange without the dark center.‘Superstar Orange’ – has extra large, bright orange flowers.‘Susie’ mix – includes orange, yellow and white flowers with or without contrasting dark eyes. .

Master Gardener: Tips for planting the Black-eyed Susan vine

On my daily commute, I pass an industrial area that is enclosed by a fence covered with vines that have bright orange flowers with dark centers.This African native is a perennial vine in frost-free locations but is commonly grown as an annual in colder climates.In our mild Southern California climate, it is likely to live for many years without being killed or seriously damaged by cold weather.Black-eyed Susan vine has a twining growth habit and should easily reach the top of your fence in a few months.Once they germinate, make sure the seedlings have strong, indirect light to prevent them from growing too lanky. .

Propagating a Black-Eyed Susan Vine

If you live in warmer, evergreen climates, you can sow black-eyed Susan seed directly into the soil where you want the vines to grow and climb.The other way to propagate your black-eyed Susan vines is to use herbaceous stem cuttings.If you live in a warmer climate area, Black-eyed Susan vines will usually propagate on their own without any assistance at all.After Black-eyed Susan Vines bloom and flowers fade or die, seeds are usually dropped to the ground that will result in new vines being created. .

How do you transplant black eyed Susan vines?

Moreover, do black eyed Susan vines reseed?To divide your black-eyed Susan flowers, first cut back the plants so they will be easier to move.Is black eyed Susan vine poisonous to dogs? .

How to Grow and Care for Black Eyed Susan Vine

This vine is a fast-grower.Better known as black-eyed Susan vine, Thunbergia alata is well-loved for its flowers that bloom all throughout its growing season.This means you can let it complete one growing season, which starts from seed germination to seed production.Afterwards, you can keep the seeds and remove the plant.Like other flowering vines, T. alata is cultivated alongside other ornamental plants in an outdoor garden.Both just have blooms with dark-colored centers.Cotyledons are the embryonic leaves inside their seeds.Their blooms are very much alike as they all have five petals each.However, the black-eyed Susan vine’s flowers stand out the most for their dark centers.Growing Conditions Black-eyed Susan vine grows well in warm climate.Each leaf can grow up to 3 inches.Black-eyed Susan vine has winged petioles.Flowers Typically, each flower has five overlapping, heart-shaped petals with a dark spot in the middle.Color The vine is well-known for having brightly orange petals and dark-colored cores.Varieties of Black-Eyed Susan Vine.Black-eyed Susan vine has more than 10 varieties.Its blooms are dark red-purple after all.Orange Wonder is also noteworthy because apart from its bright orange petals, it doesn’t have the typical dark centers.For a more colorful garden, you can grow different varieties of black-eyed Susan vine.How to Grow Black-Eyed Susan Vine.Whether you’re a beginner or a long-time gardener, black-eyed Susan vine might be an easy plant for you to grow.Perhaps, the biggest challenge is to make sure it doesn’t creep into places where you don’t want them to.Soil This vine is best grown in well-drained soil.Temperature & Humidity There’s no specific temperature range ideal for this vine’s growth.To do so, remove the vines before winter strikes or after one growing season.Watering The vine doesn’t like very dry soil.In areas with warm climate, watering once every day or two should be enough.Avoid applying excessive amounts or fertilizing frequently though.If you do any of these, you’ll end up with black-eyed Susan vine with more stems and more leaves but with fewer blooms.In case you leave the rootstock outdoors during winter, you may pour diluted liquid fertilizer twice or thrice.Before you put compost or any other organic mulch, remove the weeds near your black-eyed Susan vine.Then, apply 2 to 4 inches of organic mulch around the base of your vine.If for retaining moisture, putting the mulch is best done before the warm season starts.These are vertical growth near the roots and on the lower stem of your plant.Go over the healthy stems.Look for the older stems.Beside seeds, you can do this task using leaf, root and stem cuttings from a living plant.As for black-eyed Susan vine, you can tap seeds and stem cuttings.Seeds usually sprout 10 to 14 days after germinating them.Then, remove the leaves at the bottom of each cutting.Keep doing so until the cuttings grow roots.It’s worth noting that the plant can grow from root cuttings, too.When you prefer your ornamental black-eyed Susan vine in your garden trellis outdoors, you don’t have to transplant it.Before transplanting, you can just fill at least 2 inches of soil.If you don’t want it to creep out of the pot, prepare a simple trellis, then dig around the base of your vine.Keep holding the main root and stem as you fill the pot with additional soil.Uses of Black-Eyed Susan Vine.While it’s mainly grown as an ornamental plant, black-eyed Susan vine has other uses.One of such plants is black-eyed Susan vine.If you want to attract butterflies in your garden, this ornamental vine is also a great option.Black-eyed Susan vine makes a garden look lovelier with its eye-catching blooms.

.

The Ultimate Guide To Growing Black-Eyed Susan Vines

I am on a one woman quest to make the Black-eyed Susan vine (botamical name - Thunbergia alata) as popular as the super-needy impatiens or the mundane marigolds.This old-fashioned beauty grows extremely quickly and is very easy to care for, making it a favorite in my garden every year.As a bonus, the vines attract all sorts of pollinators including bees, butterflies and hummingbirds.Although you can find the vines in containers and hanging baskets at most big box hardware stores and garden centers, they tend to come in basic yellow or orange.You can start indoors in biodegradable (paper or peat) pots 6-8 weeks prior to your last frost date.Susie Mix - mixture of orange, yellow and white flowers on one plant.I buy mine locally, but considering you all don't live right around the block from me, I did find Black-eyed Susan vine seeds for sale online HERE.Black-eyed Susan vine does go through a period in the dead of summer heat (late-July and August) when it tends to slow down on producing blooms.Occasionally spider mites or whiteflies may infest your vines, but that is rare.In 10 years of growing Black-eyed Susan Vines I have not had this problem yet (knock on wood).I always err on the side of the more the merrier, but when you have trouble finding the urn under all those gorgeous yellow blooms come July .This year I planted Victoria Blue salvia (an annual in these parts) at the bottom on the trellis. .

Share

Related

Does Black Eyed Susan Vine Need Full Sun

Does Black Eyed Susan Vine Need Full Sun.

Botanical Name Thunbergia alata Common Names Black-eyed Susan vine, clock vine, bright eyes Plant Type Perennial flowering vine (usually grown as an annual) Mature Size 3–8 feet tall, 3–6 feet wide Sun Exposure Full sun to part shade Soil Type Rich loam, medium moisture, well-draining Soil pH 6.8 to 7.7 (slightly acidic to slightly alkaline) Bloom Time Summer to fall Flower Color Red, orange, yellow, white Hardiness Zones 10 to 11 (USDA) Native Area Eastern Africa.Although these vines don't like sitting in soggy soil, they also don't like being hot and dry.Black-eyed Susan vines grown indoors may flower in the winter if they get ample sun and the temperature doesn't fall below 60 degrees Fahrenheit.Humidity is usually not an issue for these plants, but they can struggle in very dry conditions, so make sure the soil remains moist.Black-eyed Susan vines grow quickly and bloom repeatedly throughout the summer.So they will need a light feeding every four to six weeks with a complete fertilizer to keep them growing well.Varieties of Black-Eyed Susan Vine.'Susie Mix' produces flowers in yellow, orange, and white.Growing From Seeds.Plant the seeds about 1/4 inch deep, and expect them to germinate within two to three weeks.Black-eyed Susan vine isn't prone to many problems, particularly if the plant has plenty of sun, water, and air circulation.

What Do Black Eyed Susans Look Like When They First Come Up

What Do Black Eyed Susans Look Like When They First Come Up.

Members of the aster family, Asteraceae, the "black eye" is named for the dark, brown-purple centers of its daisy-like flower heads.

Black Eyed Susan Vine In Shade

Black Eyed Susan Vine In Shade.

Black-eyed Susan vine is commonly grown in the Midwest as a season annual to provide color in a vertical setting.Seeds are often produced late in the season.The fruit resembles a bird’s head with a round base and a long ‘beak’.Seed can be sown directly where the plants are to be grown once soil temperature reaches 60F in the spring, but transplants give better results in the short growing season of the upper Midwest.Plant near the trellis, fence, or other support structure, 14-16” apart.Plants grown in containers can be overwintered indoors in a warm, very bright room.‘Bright Eyes’ – has all white flowers.Lemon A-Peel™ – has bright yellow flowers with a very dark center.‘Orange Wonder’ – all bright orange without the dark center.‘Superstar Orange’ – has extra large, bright orange flowers.‘Susie’ mix – includes orange, yellow and white flowers with or without contrasting dark eyes.