What Colors Do Black Eyed Susans Come In

What Colors Do Black Eyed Susans Come In
Edward R. Forte October 5, 2021

Black-Eyed Susans

What Colors Do Black Eyed Susans Come In

The attractive and popular purple coneflower is so easy to grow and draws so many birds and butterflies that you simply must plant it.And birds and butterflies love it. .

Black-eyed Susans: How to Plant, Grow, and Care for Black-eyed

Members of the aster family, Asteraceae, the “black eye” is named for the dark, brown-purple centers of its daisy-like flower heads. .

All About Black Eyed Susan

Their seeds germinate in the spring; they then produce flowers and set seeds that same summer.And while some of those plants may return and flower for a few more seasons -and thus are sometimes described as short-lived perennials - you cannot count on it.While they may not begin flowering quite as early each season, if you choose one of the perennial varieties we carry, either Sweet Black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia subtomentosa) (available as seeds) or the cultivar Goldstrum (Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldstrum’) (available as plants), they will return year after year to light up your fall garden. .

Black-eyed Susan Vine, Thunbergia alata – Wisconsin Horticulture

Black-eyed Susan vine is commonly grown in the Midwest as a season annual to provide color in a vertical setting.Seeds are often produced late in the season.The fruit resembles a bird’s head with a round base and a long ‘beak’.Seed can be sown directly where the plants are to be grown once soil temperature reaches 60F in the spring, but transplants give better results in the short growing season of the upper Midwest.Plant near the trellis, fence, or other support structure, 14-16” apart.Plants grown in containers can be overwintered indoors in a warm, very bright room.‘Bright Eyes’ – has all white flowers.Lemon A-Peel™ – has bright yellow flowers with a very dark center.‘Orange Wonder’ – all bright orange without the dark center.‘Superstar Orange’ – has extra large, bright orange flowers.‘Susie’ mix – includes orange, yellow and white flowers with or without contrasting dark eyes. .

All About Black-Eyed Susans

Well, no one's sure, but the legend says it all comes from an Old English poem of the post-Elizabethan era entitled simply, "Black-Eyed Susan," written by a very famous poet of the day named John Gay, 1685-1732.There are several stanzas, explaining that her William was on board, "high upon the yardarm", and quickly scrambled down for a fond farewell with his lady love.Even though it's not a native, if you seed wild Sweet William (Dianthus barbatus) with common Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta), they'll bloom beautifully for you at exactly the same time.Because both are basically biennials, and her gold plus his bright reds and purples blooming together is a sight to gladden any gardener's heart.Since Susan is a North American native, this tale tells us English colonists must have given the golden beauty her name when they arrived in the New World.However, since most all the Black-Eyed Susan species are native to the Great Plains, plant experts have wondered for years how our colonists on the east coast could have given this wildflower the name it's had for centuries.But some recent research in Maryland (where "Susan" serves as the State Flower) shows that the plant was growing there during the colonial period.Olof the Elder (shown in the photo) lived from 1630-1702 and was a world- famous scientist known mostly for his accomplishments in medicine (anatomy) and liguistics, but was also known for studies in music and botany.Throughout his career, he had the strong support of Sweden's famous Queen Christina, and was a celebrity at her court.His son, Olof the Younger (1660-1740) continued many of the father's studies, and became almost as famous in his time as a scientist and professor.Swedish scientist, Carolus Linneaus, the man who devised our system of plant nomenclature.This is the gorgeous gold wildflower you see everywhere—growing on its own, often in great golden sheets of color along the highway, in unused fields, often in "disturbed ground" and maybe in your own backyard.Generations of American children have picked them in proud bouquets, and they figure importantly in our culture.From fall or spring seeding, it germinates quickly, forming a basal rosette of its signature "hairy" green leaves, and that's all it does.In Florida, with no frost, the same seeding will bring bloom late in the summer, which leads many southern gardeners to consider the plant an annual.For example, garden expert Allan Armitage, who lives in Georgia, calls the common wildflower an annual, and reports that Rudbeckia hirta, seeded naturally in the fall, begins blooming for him and his wife (Susan) the first week of June, and continues for two months.The most successful, and a sensation when it appeared, was The Gloriosa Daisy, introduced by the W. Atlee Burpee Seed Company in the 1950's.This strain, still widely grown from seed, creates a plant a bit larger than the common wildflower, with blooms that are totally different.And "Gloriosas" are always a mixture of pure yellow and splashy bicolors, most with dark mahogany red splotches at the base of the petals, creating a stunning pinwheel effect.Most stands of Gloriosa Daisy will "run out" in about 2-3 years in a very cold climate, earning them the dreaded name, "short-lived perennial.".The great confusion among the Rudbeckias arises from the fact that the native biennial (R.

hirta) and an important hardy perennial species (R. fulgida) look almost exactly alike.This fantastically successful perennial introduction, developed in Germany, is one of the most popular and widely-planted flowering plants in America, and justly so.Each plant, once it matures, puts up a whole bouquet (probably 20) of these big flowers and holds them in bloom for weeks, even in the heat of mid-summer.This one is named after a famous family of hybridizers in the US, descended from Martin Viette, a Swiss gardener who arrived on Long Island in 1920.The species can be quite impressive in a wildflower meadow, since the big flowers and petals often flutter' in the breeze, standing above other plants.Millions of gardeners have rigged stakes to keep old Golden Glow plants standing tall with their beautiful blooms.From this wild beauty, the hybridizers have created a sensational plant called R. nitida "Herbstsonne", a tall (60-72") perennial with colossal golden flowers.The petals are wide and beautiful, and droop somewhat, but the plant makes a spectacular, elegant show.A commercial cultivar from this species is "Henry Eilers", which grows to 4 feet and has large, tubular petals with blunt tips.Surely that was smart marketing, but that little vine with its little yellow trumpet blooms is Thunbergia alata, nowhere near the Rudbeckia genus.Though the vine has nothing in common but flower color, there are other North American wildflowers who are close relatives.

.

Black-Eyed Susan

Rudbeckia, commonly called Black-eyed Susan, is a classic perennial flower that shows off bright yellow, gold, or bronze flowers with striking dark brown centers.Black-eyed Susan grows best in a spot that has full sun and well-drained soil. .

How to Grow Black-Eyed Susan Flowers

The majority of this traveling has been in line with the “Will Work for Food” variety rather than the five-star hotel kind.Growing coast to coast in the United States, these perennial flowering plants are known by names like Yellow Ox-Eye Daisy, Brown Betty, Yellow Daisy, and my all-time favorite, Poor Land Daisy.Like any good gardening feature, a dash of history goes into this article.The state flower of Maryland, black-eyed Susan has a mounding habit, growing to 2 to 3 feet tall, and can be annual, perennial, or biennial, depending on the variety and where it is grown.The origin of its common name is a trickier subject.Where to Plant and How to Use.This earns them a place in any flower garden next to zinnias, gerber daisies, and stock.It’s a good use of your space, if you’ve got it!Growing for Wildlife.It blooms during the summer and can stretch its golden foliage into late fall in a good year.The seed heads make for attractive winter interest – if you don’t mind the flower going to seed, as they love to do.The flowers are giant bullseyes for native pollinators, and this is part of their appeal to wildlife.The plant spreads easily from seed and needs little care, and your local wildlife will appreciate your caring concern for their well-being.Rudbeckia seeds are sensitive to the worst of the cold weather.Scratch the seeds into place and cover them loosely because they require light to germinate.Keep seeds and seeding moist, but not soggy.Tolerant of many soil types as well, the only time the poor land daisy might suffer is in very poor soil.They thrive in areas with more organic material, in conditions that are moist and well-drained but they can take on some drought as they mature.Many gardeners find this plant to be quite resilient and able to be grown in most any condition, including salty soils, making them a good addition to coastal landscapes.I’ve seen these flowers planted in many soil conditions in gardens and borders.In this case, gardeners will want to remove the seed heads before the flowers dry completely in late summer or fall.Likewise, for the longer-living perennial varieties, a root division every 3 to 5 years is recommended.Besides, the birds really do appreciate the seeds and I like seeing the snow-capped seed heads!Companion Planting.We’ve also got some great pairings to go with your poor land daisy.Product photos via Garden Safe, Safer Brand, Outsidepride, Nature Hills Nursery, and True Leaf Market. .

Black Eyed Susan: Everything You Need to Know

With their signature golden petals and dark, cone-like centers, Black Eyed Susans are an iconic flower found in gardens across the country during the summer months. .

Rudbeckia hirta 'Autumn Colors' (Black-Eyed Susan)

Create a membership account to save your garden designs and to view them on any device. .

Share

Related

Does Black Eyed Susan Vine Need Full Sun

Does Black Eyed Susan Vine Need Full Sun.

Botanical Name Thunbergia alata Common Names Black-eyed Susan vine, clock vine, bright eyes Plant Type Perennial flowering vine (usually grown as an annual) Mature Size 3–8 feet tall, 3–6 feet wide Sun Exposure Full sun to part shade Soil Type Rich loam, medium moisture, well-draining Soil pH 6.8 to 7.7 (slightly acidic to slightly alkaline) Bloom Time Summer to fall Flower Color Red, orange, yellow, white Hardiness Zones 10 to 11 (USDA) Native Area Eastern Africa.Although these vines don't like sitting in soggy soil, they also don't like being hot and dry.Black-eyed Susan vines grown indoors may flower in the winter if they get ample sun and the temperature doesn't fall below 60 degrees Fahrenheit.Humidity is usually not an issue for these plants, but they can struggle in very dry conditions, so make sure the soil remains moist.Black-eyed Susan vines grow quickly and bloom repeatedly throughout the summer.So they will need a light feeding every four to six weeks with a complete fertilizer to keep them growing well.Varieties of Black-Eyed Susan Vine.'Susie Mix' produces flowers in yellow, orange, and white.Growing From Seeds.Plant the seeds about 1/4 inch deep, and expect them to germinate within two to three weeks.Black-eyed Susan vine isn't prone to many problems, particularly if the plant has plenty of sun, water, and air circulation.

What Do Black Eyed Susans Look Like When They First Come Up

What Do Black Eyed Susans Look Like When They First Come Up.

Members of the aster family, Asteraceae, the "black eye" is named for the dark, brown-purple centers of its daisy-like flower heads.

Black Eyed Susan Vine In Shade

Black Eyed Susan Vine In Shade.

Black-eyed Susan vine is commonly grown in the Midwest as a season annual to provide color in a vertical setting.Seeds are often produced late in the season.The fruit resembles a bird’s head with a round base and a long ‘beak’.Seed can be sown directly where the plants are to be grown once soil temperature reaches 60F in the spring, but transplants give better results in the short growing season of the upper Midwest.Plant near the trellis, fence, or other support structure, 14-16” apart.Plants grown in containers can be overwintered indoors in a warm, very bright room.‘Bright Eyes’ – has all white flowers.Lemon A-Peel™ – has bright yellow flowers with a very dark center.‘Orange Wonder’ – all bright orange without the dark center.‘Superstar Orange’ – has extra large, bright orange flowers.‘Susie’ mix – includes orange, yellow and white flowers with or without contrasting dark eyes.