How And When To Plant Chrysanthemums

How And When To Plant Chrysanthemums
Edward R. Forte June 20, 2022

Chrysanthemums

How And When To Plant Chrysanthemums

Native to China and prized for over 2,000 years, the name “chrysanthemum” comes from the Greek words for gold (chrysos) and flower (anthos) and is often affectionately shortened to “mum.”.Pompon: Small, firm globe of tight petals (tiny ones are called “buttons”).For the home garden, the most common hardy types are the anemone, cushion, decorative, and single varieties.They need plenty of air circulation, water drainage, and morning sun to dry the dew on the leaves and stems.Chrysanthemum blooming occurs in response to shortening days and longer nights, so avoid planting near streetlights or other nighttime light sources.They can really be planted any time, though, as long as the roots have at least 6 weeks to become established before extremes of either hot or freezing weather.Dig a hole at least twice the size of the root ball, and incorporate organic matter such as compost or peat to help with drainage.For larger varieties, install support structures such as stakes or garden fencing, and try not to walk in mum beds to avoid compacting the soil.Some gardeners pinch back every few weeks until July to encourage heavy fall blooming.After blooming, some gardeners cut mums back to about 4” tall and cover with a light, airy mulch, straw, or evergreen boughs.To propagate from cuttings, snip off a piece about 4”- 6” long, and remove the leaves on the bottom half.Create your own mini-greenhouse using a wire frame and plastic wrap, and place the plants under bright light (but not sunlight) until rooted.To grow from seed, sow at least 2 months before first frost, or start indoors over the winter. .

Chrysanthemums: How to Plant and Grow Mums

Chrysanthemums or “mums,” the quintessential autumn flower celebrate the season in jewel colors: Yellow, lavender pink, purple, red, bronze, orange, and white.Bloom forms range in size from pincushion petite to giant spiders, and there are hundreds from which to chose.Since then, the mum has been bred in so many shapes, sizes, showy styles and a multitude of colors that it doesn’t always resemble its humble beginnings.A ruling of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature in 1999 changed the defining species of the genus Chrysanthemum to C. indicum, giving the florist mum back its prized generic name.” The National Chrysanthemum Society divides bloom forms into 13 classes. .

Growing Chrysanthemum: Learn How to Plant & Care for Mums

It seems as soon as the air cools, signaling the coming of fall, garden centers begin showcasing full mounds of brilliant red, yellow, and violet flowers.With a little understanding and a few simple tips, you can have a lush, beautiful fall chrysanthemum garden display to help celebrate the changing of seasons.Chrysanthemum are a member of the Compositae family and are available in a wide range of brilliant colors, shapes and sizes.First cultivated in China over 6 centuries ago, this type of daisy was initially grown as an herb associated with the power of life.The chrysanthemum flowers range from dazzling whites to deep bronzes, and the hardy plants are highlighted with full, dark green leaves.These daisy-like blooms feature long, tubular florets clustered around a tight button center.These daisy-like blooms feature long, tubular florets clustered around a tight button center.Popular varieties include: Dorothy Mechum, Purple Light and Angel Decorative.Popular varieties include: Fireflash, Coral Charm and Honeyglow Irregular Incurve.Popular varieties include: Luxor, Blushing Bride and River City Intermediate Incurve.With shorter florets curving inwards, the less-compact bloom of an intermediate incurve only reaches a maximum 6 inches.With shorter florets curving inwards, the less-compact bloom of an intermediate incurve only reaches a maximum 6 inches.Popular varieties include: Apricot Alexis, Candid and Pat Lawson Regular Incurve.Regular incurve chrysanthemum blossoms are tight, smooth globes of inwardly curving florets.Regular incurve chrysanthemum blossoms are tight, smooth globes of inwardly curving florets.Popular varieties include: Rocky, Yoko Ono and Lavender Pixie Quilled.Show-stopping quilled chrysanthemums feature long, tubular florets that open to a spoon shape or slight downward curve at the end.Popular varieties include: Seatons Toffee, Mammoth Yellow Quill and Muted Sunshine.Show-stopping quilled chrysanthemums feature long, tubular florets that open to a spoon shape or slight downward curve at the end.Popular varieties include: Seatons Toffee, Mammoth Yellow Quill and Muted Sunshine Single and Semi-Double.Their total plant size is between 1 to 3 feet, making them ideal for small spaces and borders.Their total plant size is between 1 to 3 feet, making them ideal for small spaces and borders.Popular varieties include: Rage, Icy Island and Crimson Glory Spider.Popular varieties include: Evening Glow, Symphony and Western Voodoo Spoon.You’ll easily find mums in garden centers and nurseries in both fall and spring, but planning ahead is key to successful planting.It’s tempting to buy those huge beautiful fall mums you see during the autumn season, but in terms of longevity, the smaller spring mums are actually a better investment.The root system becomes stronger throughout the summer and fall, which increases a plant’s ability to survive the winter.The chrysanthemums you purchase in garden centers are frequently referred to as “hardy mums” for a reason.Although they technically require only 6 hours of sunlight each day, the more light they receive, the better their growth, bloom and hardiness.Slight shade in hot, summer afternoons is appropriate in warmer gardening zones to prevent scorching.Mums bloom due to their photoperiodic nature.When the plant senses a change in the length of darkness in late summer, it begins to set buds.However, keep in mind that by fall, most properly planted mums will reach up to 3 feet in height and width.Plants that are too crowded compete for nutrients, have root system issues, attract pests and suffer from disease.Following the plant spacing directions for your chrysanthemum variety increases the health of your garden and protects your investment of time and money.Knowing how to care for chrysanthemums properly simply requires basic gardening techniques.The ideal watering method for mums is one that applies moisture directly to the base of the plants.The ideal watering method for mums is one that applies moisture directly to the base of the plants.Research reveals that allowing it to die back naturally over the winter produces a stronger plant.Research reveals that allowing it to die back naturally over the winter produces a stronger plant.The primary growth of chrysanthemum plant varieties takes place in spring and early summer.The primary growth of chrysanthemum plant varieties takes place in spring and early summer.You can discard the woody center of the plant, since it won’t perform as well as the younger, outer sections.Although most mums are purchased from garden centers as already-established plants or propagated from cuttings and division, you can grow chrysanthemums from seed.Because mums require the proper sunlight to set blooms, placing your plant in a south-facing window and away from artificial light produces the best results.Storing in a protected garage during the winter months can help your plant rest for new spring growth.Plants grown from seed may take several years to reach their full growth potential.Taking proper care of mums through watering, fertilizing and pinching increases the fullness and growth capabilities of the plant. .

How to Grow & Care for Fall Mums

Use these tips to help you plant, grow, and enjoy this favorite autumn flower.Today's hybrids in both categories result from endless crosses between several species from China and Japan.Florist mums have many possible bloom forms, including quilled, pompon, spider, and more.You can plant a potted florist mum out you receive as a gift but don't expect it to survive the winter outside, no matter how much protection you give it.Gently breaking up the root ball and giving the mum a new home in some fresh potting soil will set your plant up for success.Chrysanthemums love full sun, and all that heat means they also need plenty of water.Give them a good soak after repotting, then water every other day or whenever the soil seems dry.Because of their tight, mounded habit and profusion of blooms, garden mums are perfect for mass plantings.Another possibility is to arrange a gradual transition of related colors in an ombre effect.Choose ornamental grasses, berry shrubs, sedum, or any conifer for texture.Choose orange, bronze, yellow, and creamy white mums if you decorate with pumpkins and gourds for fall.However, if you have a lot of evergreen plants that provide a backdrop of varying shades of green foliage, try bright pinks, lavenders, pure whites, or reds.With such bold colors, a large grouping of mums can add excitement to even the blandest of fall landscapes.Most garden mums will withstand a light fall frost, but finding the best cultivars will let you enjoy them for as long as possible.Fall planting lessens the chance of winter survival because roots don't have time to establish themselves enough.If you want something more permanent and are willing to provide proper care such as mulching and pinching to encourage compact growth and more blooms, plant mums in the spring and allow them to get established in the garden.Plants that don't get enough sunlight will be tall and leggy and produce fewer, smaller flowers.Don't put potted mums out too early in the season when summer's temps are still in full swing.If the soil doesn't drain properly, add compost and mix it into an 8-12 inch depth for best performance.You could also grow mums in raised beds filled with a garden soil mix that drains well.Plant mums about 1 inch deeper than they were in the nursery pot, being careful with the roots as you spread them.Pinch off dead blooms to clean up the plant, but leave branches intact.If your mums survive the winter, you'll see new growth developing around the base of the plant in early spring.Replant the outer portions into a rejuvenated bed, and discard the original center of the plant.The key to those full, rounded domes of blooms that you associate with mums is pinching to create more branching and keep plants compact.To pinch a plant, remove the growing tip of a stem by nipping it between your thumb and forefinger.Next, pinch about half the tender new growth at the top of the shoot; choose a few stems with buds and some without.These mums have outer flower petals of one (single) or two to three (semidouble), growing very close together from the center disk.These flowers only grow about 4 inches in diameter, making them a petite mum to add to your garden that won't take up too much space.The most popular of the spoon mums is 'Kimie,' which shows off golden yellow petals in a single row around a tight center disk.This mum has one or more rows of single flat petals topped with a raised center of tiny disk florets. .

Planting Potted Mums Outdoors as Year-Round Perennials

Can you plant those spring or fall potted chrysanthemums sold at grocery stores in your garden?Some of the potted mums we get in spring around Easter or in Fall may grow as perennials in your garden but not all of them will work.The problem is there are dozens of species and thousands of varieties of the genus Chrysanthemum in the Asteraceae family.Enter your city and state or province to find your first and last frost dates and number of frost-free days.Enter your city and state or province to find your first and last frost dates and number of frost-free days.If you want better odds, your best bet is to track down a plant nursery that has successfully tested specific varieties in your winters.If you want to gamble with grocery store mums of unknown hardiness—and why not if you have room to experiment?—your best bet is to overwinter them in their containers in a protected space (above freezing, never letting the soil dry out).Then, you can plant them in spring, providing lots of time to establish strong roots before their first winter in the ground.“Showy perennials that flower from August until frost, these U of M mums are uniquely developed to withstand USDA Zone 3 and 4 growing conditions and will usually overwinter when covered with a protective mulch in late fall.“… in research trials at the University of Vermont Horticultural Research Center in S. Burlington, of the 80 varieties trialed over a period of four years, none was found to be reliably hardy for the Burlington area, one of the milder areas of the state.Lack of a good snow cover affected the plants’ survival rate.These tips are for planting decorative but hardy potted chrysanthemums outdoors for year-round growing.Mums will not tolerate dry soil (they’ll die) so stay on top of the watering from the moment you get them.Set aside several inches of mulch (compost, ground-up leaves, bark, or straw) to place around the plant after the ground freezes.As said, without more information about the plant’s hardiness, it’s hard to guess whether it will grow, but it’s worth a try if you have room for it. .

Learn About Chrysanthemums

Botrytis: This fungus causes a grey mold on flowers, leaves, stems and buds.Powdery Mildew: This fungus disease occurs on the top of the leaves in humid weather conditions.Verticillium Wilt: First seen on leaves in late spring after fruit production has begun.Aphids: Greenish, red, black or peach colored sucking insects that can spread disease as they feed on the undersides of leaves.Burpee Recommends: Introduce or attract natural predators into your garden such as lady beetles and wasps who feed on aphids.Leafminers: These insects bore just under the leaf surface causing irregular serpentine lines.They suck on the plant juices removing chlorophyll and injecting toxins which cause white dots on the foliage.Burpee Recommends: Many thrips may be repelled by sheets of aluminum foil spread between rows of plants.They may be found around the stems in the soil are and ¼ to ¾ inch long, thin, yellow brown worms with a shiny skin.The adults are called click beetles, and are about 1/3 inch long, reddish brown with a hard shell.Check with your Cooperative Extension Service for pesticide recommendations which must be applied prior to planting. .

Share

Related

How And When To Plant Chrysanthemums

How And When To Plant Chrysanthemums.

Native to China and prized for over 2,000 years, the name “chrysanthemum” comes from the Greek words for gold (chrysos) and flower (anthos) and is often affectionately shortened to “mum.”.Pompon: Small, firm globe of tight petals (tiny ones are called “buttons”).For the home garden, the most common hardy types are the anemone, cushion, decorative, and single varieties.They need plenty of air circulation, water drainage, and morning sun to dry the dew on the leaves and stems.Chrysanthemum blooming occurs in response to shortening days and longer nights, so avoid planting near streetlights or other nighttime light sources.They can really be planted any time, though, as long as the roots have at least 6 weeks to become established before extremes of either hot or freezing weather.Dig a hole at least twice the size of the root ball, and incorporate organic matter such as compost or peat to help with drainage.For larger varieties, install support structures such as stakes or garden fencing, and try not to walk in mum beds to avoid compacting the soil.Some gardeners pinch back every few weeks until July to encourage heavy fall blooming.After blooming, some gardeners cut mums back to about 4” tall and cover with a light, airy mulch, straw, or evergreen boughs.To propagate from cuttings, snip off a piece about 4”- 6” long, and remove the leaves on the bottom half.Create your own mini-greenhouse using a wire frame and plastic wrap, and place the plants under bright light (but not sunlight) until rooted.To grow from seed, sow at least 2 months before first frost, or start indoors over the winter.

How To Care For Chrysanthemums In Pots

How To Care For Chrysanthemums In Pots.

These plants can thrive when potted and this can be an excellent way to protect them from frost and other harsh winter conditions.Growing these plants in pots is not difficult at all so even beginner gardeners can do it without problem.This is by far the number one reason why people choose to grow Chrysanthemums as potted plants.These plants are not demanding when it comes to soil conditions so it is very easy to make them thrive.You can improve the soil's quality and conditions by adding a bit of compost or other organic matter to the mix.For the best results, position your Chrysanthemums at a clear and sunny spot in your home, balcony, patio, terrace or another place.This is bad for Chrysanthemums since they require proper air flow to grow.It is important that he pot has good drainage holes so your plants do not sit in water.Keep in mind that Chrysanthemums have a shallow root system so they dry up very fast.It is important to add some fertilizer to promote healthy roots and to help with bud development.Chrysanthemums are susceptible to certain diseases, such as grey mold, powdery mildew and root rot.

Why Are My Chrysanthemum Blooms Dying

Why Are My Chrysanthemum Blooms Dying.

Hardening off a plant whether from inside to be able to live outside or the reverse is critical.You are essentially putting your mum starts into a forced dormancy.In the spring, if the stems are still green you can then begin to harden off to the out of doors.This will give your plants more light for the lower leaves and room for watering.