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Crocuses

What Do Crocus Bulbs Look Like

What Do Crocus Bulbs Look Like

Crocus flowers come in Easter-egg colors of purple, yellow, lavender, cream and white.Over time, these carefree bulbs will naturalize and multiply to produce more flowers every year.Crocus blossoms are magnets for winter-weary bees, who are drawn to the rich, golden pollen inside each flower.The bulbs bloom and die back before most trees and shrubs have leafed out, which means they are suitable for planting in areas that may be shaded in the summer.With good drainage and warmth from nearby stones, they’ll bloom extra early.Flowerbeds and Walkways: Get your flower garden off to an early start by planting crocus along with other spring-blooming bulbs such as tulips, daffodils, muscari and hyacinths.Nestle a few crocus bulbs near the edge of a walkway, pathway or steps and enjoy their delicate blossoms every spring for years to come.To watch a short video about planting crocus and scilla bulbs in a lawn, click HERE.Unlike some bulbs, crocus don’t mind competition from neighboring plants.If these pesky critters are a problem in your yard, you can help protect newly planted bulbs by covering the area with screening or by spraying the soil with a scent deterrent.Snow and extreme cold can damage crocus blossoms that are already open but this will not affect the bulb or future flowers.You can leave them to dry and disappear or give the foliage a gentle tug so it pulls away from the bulb.Over time, large clusters of crocus may become overcrowded and produce fewer flowers.

Are Crocus Bulbs Poisonous To Humans

Are Crocus Bulbs Poisonous To Humans

The spring crocus is a genus of perennial flowering plants native to Europe, the Middle East and parts of Asia.It belongs to the Colchicaceae family (in the same order as lilies) and contains a deadly toxin, colchicine that can be fatal for dogs and humans even in small doses.Spring crocuses on the other hand, are not poisonous, although ingestion can cause adverse effects like vomiting, diarrhea, and general gastrointestinal upset.

Tulips Lilies And Crocuses All Grow From Bulbs

Tulips Lilies And Crocuses All Grow From Bulbs

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Why Do My Saffron Crocus Not Flower

Why Do My Saffron Crocus Not Flower

But what if you spend time planting crocuses in the fall and wait eagerly all winter… only to see a blank field staring back at you in February, March, April, and well into May?Even worse, perhaps the corms pushed spiky green leaves out of the ground but buds never joined them.They muscle through newly thawed earth, poking leaves and buds into crisp late-winter air.The thing is, the hardy bulbs need loose, well-draining soil in order to get through the three- to four-inch layer you planted them in last fall.It’s possible that you were so excited to plant the corms that you forgot to make sure the soil wasn’t too heavy and sandy, or too thick and clay-like.Or perhaps wet, heavy snows – or even something as simple as your dog’s favorite route through the lawn – has compacted the earth and your crocus leaves and buds are having a hard time poking through.(To avoid potentially forgetting, make a rough drawing of your yard and sketch the areas you plant with crocuses and other bulbs.Bulbs that are bad from the moment you open your newly purchased bag need to go straight back to whoever sold them to you.Say you had a beautiful crop of crocuses last year, but now you notice stunted yellow leaves growing out of the ground and no flowers in sight.Dig up a corm or two and check for fusarium rot, the most likely culprit, according to Janis Ruksans, author of “Crocuses: A Complete Guide to the Genus.”.This disease isn’t likely to affect vernal crocuses once they’ve been planted, so long as you live in USDA Hardiness Zones 3-8.If you live in Zone 9, you can still plant crocuses but you need to chill the bulbs in the refrigerator for 12-15 weeks during the winter.You’ll have to toss out infected bulbs and go easy on the fertilizer (or use none at all), as too much nitrogen can contribute to fusarium rot.To prevent the mold from spreading and killing more of your flowers, cut away all affected parts of the plant and spray what’s left with fungicide.You’ll then need to dig up the corms to check them for those blackish brown spots; if they’re infected, throw them out.Our backyard hosted a colony of witty squirrels who’d sit on my outer kitchen windowsill so I could watch them eat my precious pecans while I washed the dishes.I had a hungry young garden-destroyer that ate all my cabbage one year, plus all the leaves off my apple, plum, and willow trees.The very same night the moose attacked my precious fruit trees, I went to the gardening store and bought supplies to build a moose-proof fence around each one.Plantskydd repels moose, deer, rabbits, voles, elk, opossum, beavers, and otters, should you be lucky enough to get the latter in your own backyard.Plantskydd worked well on my herbs and carrot garden, which I harvested and enjoyed before planting that fated cabbage.Grape hyacinths and snowdrops are perfect for planting in the same trench as crocus corms, as all three have bulbs that need to be buried 3-4 inches deep.Check out this mix of grape hyacinths and daffodils from Eden Brothers for a perfect critter-resistant duo to plant with your crocuses.This can cause bulbs to rot or to produce foliage but no blooms, as they have been busy putting energy into corm development.If you don’t plant your corms deep enough, they might be exposed to too much temperature fluctuation during wintertime, as they are not insulated by the soil.Crocuses like full sunshine or part shade, so keep an eye on how much light they’re getting throughout the day.If the soil you’re planting in is already well-draining, dark, and crumbly – signifying that it’s rich in organic matter – you really don’t need to fertilize the crocuses.So, since they can survive in the cold and snow, have a little patience and keep looking out for those vibrant flowers to pop through the earth! .

When Can I Plant In Zone 6b

When Can I Plant In Zone 6b

These dates will vary a week or two so it’s important to watch the weather before planting.Knowing when to transplant seedlings outdoors will help to maximize your harvest.

When Do Crocuses Bloom In Pennsylvania

When Do Crocuses Bloom In Pennsylvania

Although each season’s weather can make a couple of weeks’ difference one way or the other, here’s a list of what typically peaks during which months in south-central Pennsylvania to help you with your spring-planting plans:.* Trees/Shrubs: Cornelian cherry dogwood, forsythia, Oregon grape holly, spicebush, star magnolia, sweetbox, witch hazel.* Perennials: Barrenwort, bergenia, bleeding heart, bloodroot, brunnera, columbine, creeping phlox, euphorbia, foamflowers, lamium, Lenten rose, myrtle (Vinca minor), primrose, pulmonaria, rock cress,Virginia bluebells.* Perennials: Ajuga, amsonia, bachelor buttons, baptisia, barrenwort, brunnera, candytuft, catmint, chives, creeping veronica, dianthus, foamybells, forget-me-knot, fringe-leaf bleeding heart, geum, goats beard, hardy geranium, Jacob’s ladder, lamium, lily of the valley, meadow rue, iris, peony, salvia, snow-in-summer, sweet woodruff, Solomon’s seal, thrift, trillium.* Trees/Shrubs: Azalea, beautybush, Carolina silverbell, cherry laurel, chokeberry, clematis, coralberry, deutzia, fringetree, Japanese snowbell, Kousa dogwood, hawthorn, honeysuckle, horse chestnut, lilac, ornamental kiwi vine, redtwig dogwood, rhododendron, tree peony, sweetshrub, viburnum, weigela.* Perennials: Astilbe, baptisia, bellflowers, catmint, coralbells, coreopsis, daylilies, delphinium, dianthus, gas plant, evening primrose, feather reed grass, filipendula, foxglove, foxtail lily, gaillardia, gaura, goats beard, hardy geranium, hosta, knautia, lady’s mantle, lamium, lavender, lupine, penstemon, poppies, red hot poker, rodgersia, rose mallow, scabiosa, shooting star, silene, spiderwort, tiger lilies, verbascum, veronica, yarrow, yellow corydalis, yucca.* Perennials: Agastache, Asiatic and Oriental lilies, baby’s breath, balloon flowers, beebalm, black-eyed susans, blackberry lily, butterfly weed, cimicifuga, coreopsis, crocosmia, daylilies, fountain grass, gaillardia, garden phlox, gaura, goldenrod, heliopsis, hollyhock, hosta, Jupiter’s beard, liatris, obedient plant, persicaria, purple coneflower, veronica, red hot poker, Russian sage, sea holly, shasta daisy, silphium, soapwort, stokesia, veronica, veronicastrum.* Perennials: Agastache, aster, black-eyed susans, cardinal flower, garden phlox, goldenrod, hardy hibiscus, heliopsis, hosta, Japanese anemone, Joe Pye weed, leadwort, ligularia, liriope, miscanthus, monkshood, perennial sunflower, purple coneflower, reblooming daylilies, Russian sage, sedum, sneezeweed, switchgrass, turtlehead, veronica, yarrow.* Trees/Shrubs: Beautyberry, blue mist shrub (Caryopteris), butterfly bush, crape myrtle, rose-of-sharon, seven son flower (Heptacodium), tree hydrangea, vitex.* Perennials: Agastache, aster, boltonia, catmint, gaillardia, gaura, goldenrod, Japanese anemone, Joe Pye weed, lavender, leadwort, liriope, mums, reblooming daylilies, Russian sage, salvia, sedum, toad lily, turtlehead.Example: oakleaf hydrangea, which blooms white in late spring, gets burgundy foliage in fall and then shows off peeling bark when the leaves drop for winter.

Are Crocus Plants Poisonous To Dogs

Are Crocus Plants Poisonous To Dogs

), liver and kidney damage, respiratory failure, central nervous system signs (e.g., seizures), and even death.If you are not sure which Crocus plant your dog or cat ingested, seek veterinary attention immediately or contact Pet Poison Helpline for treatment recommendations.

What Does A Wild Crocus Look Like

What Does A Wild Crocus Look Like

The true harbinger of spring, its mauve petals dot the still drab prairie landscape, often before the last winter have melted.By blooming so early, the crocus assures itself of the complete attention of available pollinators - small bees and other insects.Tufts of much-divided leaves emerge once flowering is finished and the risk of severe frost is over, but still well before most other prairie plants.Individual plants may live for 50 years, or more, and a large specimen could be 30 cm across and boast more than 40 blossoms at a time.Crocus seeds are shaped like spears and are covered with backward pointing hairs.The long tail is "differentially hydrophyllic" - meaning it is composed of strands which soak up water at different rates or to different amounts.The net result is that when the tail gets wet or dries out, it moves, twisting as the fibers stretch or contract in relation to each other.Remember, in a prairie ecosystem there is very little open soil for seeds, and no one to dig a hole and "plant" them.The strategy is found among a wide range of prairie plants and reaches its zenith with Porcupine Grass (Stipa spartea).Neither is the fuzzy centre of the crocus (composed of numerous yellow stamens and a tuft of greyish pistils - that become plumed fruit), nor its highly reflective petals.The sunlight that reaches the crocus' shiny petals is reflected into the flower centre.This energy is bounced around between the stamens and pistils warming these vital reproductive parts of the flower.The warmth at the flower centre aids the development of pollen and seeds, but may also help insects survive and reproduce in the somewhat harsh climate of early spring.On a cool spring day the centre of a crocus flower is a place to warm up a bit!A crocus may flower at the start of its 3rd growth season, but usually needs 4-5 years before it will put on a good show.Only take a small amount of seeds from any one patch of crocuses to ensure there will be plenty around for natural propagation of the plants.If you don't happen to have a crocus patch nearby, where you can pick your own seeds, you can purchase some from the Living Prairie Museum in Winnipeg (see link below).Crocus seeds can be planted outdoors right after they are collected, or in autumn, or the following spring.If the seeds go dormant they will require stratification (several weeks of exposure to cool moist conditions) before they will germinate.To plant crocus seeds outdoors choose a sunny location and prepare the site as follows.In a natural area (such as a meadow or prairie), loosen the top layer (1-2 cm) of sod or soil and remove any plants, roots or debris.It was a football sized mound of mauve petals with bright yellow centers.It takes about 3 years to bloom for the first time and you're lucky to get more than one flower, but after that the number of blossoms increases dramatically.Thoroughly soak the soil in the trays with water and keep them moist until the crocuses begin to germinate.Young crocus plants will spend their first year or two growing an extensive root system, an important adaptation to drought-prone prairie environments.They will usually not flower until their third growing season, but from then on they will reward your patience by blooming faithfully for many years.Anemo (from Greek) - pertaining to the wind, patens(from Latin) - spreading or outspread.Pulsatilla (from Latin "pulsare") - to beat or pulse, perhaps a reference to the daily opening and closing of the blooms.Check out their Crocus Photo Contest at the Arden, Manitoba web site.

What Does Crocus Bulb Mean

What Does Crocus Bulb Mean

Crocus flowers come in Easter-egg colors of purple, yellow, lavender, cream and white.Over time, these carefree bulbs will naturalize and multiply to produce more flowers every year.Crocus blossoms are magnets for winter-weary bees, who are drawn to the rich, golden pollen inside each flower.The bulbs bloom and die back before most trees and shrubs have leafed out, which means they are suitable for planting in areas that may be shaded in the summer.With good drainage and warmth from nearby stones, they’ll bloom extra early.Flowerbeds and Walkways: Get your flower garden off to an early start by planting crocus along with other spring-blooming bulbs such as tulips, daffodils, muscari and hyacinths.Nestle a few crocus bulbs near the edge of a walkway, pathway or steps and enjoy their delicate blossoms every spring for years to come.To watch a short video about planting crocus and scilla bulbs in a lawn, click HERE.Unlike some bulbs, crocus don’t mind competition from neighboring plants.If these pesky critters are a problem in your yard, you can help protect newly planted bulbs by covering the area with screening or by spraying the soil with a scent deterrent.Snow and extreme cold can damage crocus blossoms that are already open but this will not affect the bulb or future flowers.You can leave them to dry and disappear or give the foliage a gentle tug so it pulls away from the bulb.Over time, large clusters of crocus may become overcrowded and produce fewer flowers.

Crocuses And Daffodils Cross Stitch

Crocuses And Daffodils Cross Stitch

Wir bringen kreative Köpfe mit all denjenigen zusammen, die auf der Suche nach etwas Besonderem sind – für mehr Menschlichkeit im Handel.

Can You Plant Crocuses In October

Can You Plant Crocuses In October

Crocus bulbs (technically called “corms”) not only provide winter garden color, but they naturalize, meaning that they spread and come back year after year—with minimum care—for an ever-larger display.

How Long Do Snowdrop Bulbs Last

How Long Do Snowdrop Bulbs Last

Botanical Name Galanthus nivalis Family Amaryllidaceae (Amaryllis) Plant Type Perennial bulb (hardy in the North) Mature Size 3 to 6 inches tall Sun Exposure Full sun to partial shade Soil Type Loamy, sandy, humusy, well-drained Soil pH Acidic, neutral, alkaline Bloom Time Early spring Flower Color White Hardiness Zones 3 to 7, USA Native Areas Western Asia and Eastern Europe Toxicity Toxic to people, pets.Plant snowdrop bulbs 3 inches deep in soil that you have thoroughly loosened ahead of time.Add a bulb fertilizer when you plant to get the snowdrops off to an optimal start.Do not buy the bulbs too far ahead of time: They can dry out and lose viability if they are left lying around too long.After the plants come up and flower in spring, allow the foliage to yellow or brown before removing it (or just let it decompose, returning nutrients to the soil).This allows the plant to store the maximum amount of nutrients in its bulb, which will keep it healthy and ensure good flowering for next year.If left alone, the foliage disappears by late spring or summer as the bulbs go dormant.To remind yourself that the snowdrop bulbs remain underground in this space (so that you do not accidentally disturb them), mark them with a plant label.As small plants that need good drainage, snowdrops are well suited for rock gardens, where they will provide some early-season interest.Glory-of-the-snow bulbs (Chionodoxa): Light pink, blue, lavender, or white flowers; zones 4 to 9.): Purple, lavender, orange, yellow, blue, white, and cream flowers; zones 3 to 8 (typically).Winter aconite bulbs (Eranthis hyemalis): Bright yellow flowers; zones 3 to 7.But because they bloom so early in the spring, providing snowdrops with sufficient sunlight generally is not a problem: They flower before trees such as maple (Acer spp.).A bulb fertilizer can be added at planting time to help boost your snowdrops to a good start.A late fall addition of compost should provide nutritional needs for next year's bloom.Leucojum vernum, a plant of about the same size as the giant snowdrop (1 foot tall), is called the "spring snowflake.".Snowdrops come up every year and may multiply and spread over time; in fact, they will frequently naturalize.Consumers almost always begin their snowdrop patch by buying the bulbs (readily available at home improvement centers in the fall).Unlike with some plants, such as Wisteria, which can be fussy bloomers, no additional steps are required to get snowdrops to bloom.Avoid letting kids or pets come into contact with any parts of the plants, and definitely don't eat them.

How To Grow Crocus Flowers

How To Grow Crocus Flowers

Crocus bulbs (technically called “corms”) not only provide winter garden color, but they naturalize, meaning that they spread and come back year after year—with minimum care—for an ever-larger display.

What Does A Crocus Represent

What Does A Crocus Represent

The name Crocus traces back through many Middle Eastern and Mediterranean languages to the root word for saffron in Sanskrit.The name dates back thousands of years along with the history of the plant’s cultivation as a spice.Depending on the exact species and variety, Crocus plants can bloom in the spring, autumn, or winter.Saffron is generally not used much in herbalism, but some Chinese Traditional Medicine sources attribute to it a calming and warming use.As an early or late blooming plant, Crocuses are very important to bees as a nectar source.Like many other flowers that grow in the Mediterranean area, the Crocus has a rich history of symbolism stretching back to Ancient Greece.This joyful color is less romantic than red, making it great for conveying love and admiration for friends and family members.A bouquet of Crocuses in this color can indicate a humble approach or wishes of condolences for someone in grief.This color is commonly associated with funerals in some cultures, but it’s also used for weddings due to its ties to purity and elegance in others.Humans have been cultivating Crocus plants for over 3,000 years now due to their value as a spice and dye source.With so many years of close contact with the plants, it’s no wonder it has become a potent source of symbolism for multiple cultures.The earliest cultivation of saffron is recorded during the Minoan and Hittite empires in the Mediterranean and Middle East.Frescos from this period show young girls almost always picking the flowers, linking the bloom to youth and joyfulness.The most common story includes a mortal man named Crocus who fell in love with a nymph.Autumn blooming Crocuses may inspire some artists and writers to use it as a symbol of hope in the face of loss or death instead.It’s easy to find examples of these uses through poems from writers like Emily Dickinson, Alfred Kreymborg, and Louise Gluck.Thanks to their rich yellow color, these tiny strands are commonly linked to wealth, divinity, power, and health.They’re given as gifts in the Middle East and Asia for housewarmings and weddings to symbolize the hope for a prosperous future.They’re ideal as part of a bouquet meant to express joy and a wish for renewal, which makes it especially appropriate for the season.Due to its symbolic link with devotion and rebirth, many people also choose to give or use Crocus flowers as wedding bouquets.Place in water immediately after cutting and add a few drops of vinegar to prevent bacterial growth.Crocus blooms are beautiful and moving whether they’re emerging from your flower beds or part of a bouquet.

When Do Crocus Bulbs Flower Uk

When Do Crocus Bulbs Flower Uk

Crocus flowers come in Easter-egg colors of purple, yellow, lavender, cream and white.Over time, these carefree bulbs will naturalize and multiply to produce more flowers every year.Crocus blossoms are magnets for winter-weary bees, who are drawn to the rich, golden pollen inside each flower.The bulbs bloom and die back before most trees and shrubs have leafed out, which means they are suitable for planting in areas that may be shaded in the summer.With good drainage and warmth from nearby stones, they’ll bloom extra early.Flowerbeds and Walkways: Get your flower garden off to an early start by planting crocus along with other spring-blooming bulbs such as tulips, daffodils, muscari and hyacinths.Nestle a few crocus bulbs near the edge of a walkway, pathway or steps and enjoy their delicate blossoms every spring for years to come.To watch a short video about planting crocus and scilla bulbs in a lawn, click HERE.Unlike some bulbs, crocus don’t mind competition from neighboring plants.If these pesky critters are a problem in your yard, you can help protect newly planted bulbs by covering the area with screening or by spraying the soil with a scent deterrent.Snow and extreme cold can damage crocus blossoms that are already open but this will not affect the bulb or future flowers.You can leave them to dry and disappear or give the foliage a gentle tug so it pulls away from the bulb.Over time, large clusters of crocus may become overcrowded and produce fewer flowers.

When To Plant Crocuses In Zone 6a

When To Plant Crocuses In Zone 6a

Crocus bulbs (technically called “corms”) not only provide winter garden color, but they naturalize, meaning that they spread and come back year after year—with minimum care—for an ever-larger display.

When To Plant Crocuses In Denver

When To Plant Crocuses In Denver

With the temperatures still soaring into the high 80s, it’s hard to believe that it’s already time to prepare our gardens for fall bulb planting.But, if a thriving bed of brilliant or pastel blooms is your goal for this spring, now is the time to begin!Fortunately, we have a team of experts that can give you a leg up on making your flower beds the envy of the neighborhood.In general, crocus, snowdrops, dwarf iris and Siberian squill are very early bloomers.Focus on planting bulbs that squirrels don’t like to avoid them digging up and ruining your display.At Fall Plant & Bulb Sale, our horticulture staff can assist you with making these evaluations.Make sure you read the instructions on each bulb package to understand when they need to be planted, how deep and what sort of care they require.If you aren’t planting your bulbs immediately, be prepared to store them in a dry, dark place that is cool but not freezing.If you plant too early, the warmer soil temperatures may burn the flower already developing inside the bulb and it won’t bloom.

Can You Grow Crocus Indoors

Can You Grow Crocus Indoors

The delicate watercolor color variations of white-flowered flowers, yellow, and lilac-pink can be chosen to suit your taste.Crocus flowers do not exceed 5 inches (12 cm) in height at their peak.The single cup-shaped Crocus flower, with its large perianth and corolla divided into six oval lobes, needs no introduction.For indoor cultivation, use the largest, mature corals of at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) in diameter – elite, select planting material.Inspect them carefully before planting and repot them in a weak fungicide (manganese or systemic preparation) solution.Depending on the size of the pot or box, these groups can be either large or compact.There are only two requirements for containers – drainage holes and not too deep (the standard is the height of 3-4 palms).Pour drainage agent at the bottom of the container and substrate on top at the height of 2-3 inches (5-7.5 cm).Crocus flowers can be potted in inert soil such as perlite, vermiculite, expanded clay, moss, or hydrogel, leaving the top above the substrate.During the rooting stage, Crocus flowers need a combination of “shade + cool.”.Once the first signs of growth appear, you should begin to pay close attention to the condition of the plants and the moisture content of the soil.However, there is no need to rush to change the conditions until the seedlings grow to 1-2 inches (2.5-5 cm).Plants with fully grown flowering arrows can be gradually moved to light and warm locations.For 3 to 5 days, it is best to place them in a semi-shady area or a cool place with a hood and raise the temperature only slightly – to 50-59 °F (10-15°C), if there is no suitable location – by ventilating or laying snow in trays to cool the plants).as bright a light as possible, on a sunny windowsill (best in the south) as cool as possible – preferably no more than 64 °F (18°C) during the day and 48-53 °F (9-12°C) at night.But if you let the leaves fade, let the bulbs rest until August, and then plant them in a warm, protected clearing in your garden, you can guarantee yourself the pleasure of seeing spreading clusters and colorful early blooms for several years.Standing water in the trays and constant dampness in the soil can quickly destroy even the strongest of plants.The most troublesome pest problem for domestic Crocus flower grass is the aphid, which prefers small bulbs.At the first sign of a pest, isolate Crocus flower and begin an insecticide treatment.

Why Do My Crocus Not Flower

Why Do My Crocus Not Flower

But what if you spend time planting crocuses in the fall and wait eagerly all winter… only to see a blank field staring back at you in February, March, April, and well into May?Even worse, perhaps the corms pushed spiky green leaves out of the ground but buds never joined them.They muscle through newly thawed earth, poking leaves and buds into crisp late-winter air.The thing is, the hardy bulbs need loose, well-draining soil in order to get through the three- to four-inch layer you planted them in last fall.It’s possible that you were so excited to plant the corms that you forgot to make sure the soil wasn’t too heavy and sandy, or too thick and clay-like.Or perhaps wet, heavy snows – or even something as simple as your dog’s favorite route through the lawn – has compacted the earth and your crocus leaves and buds are having a hard time poking through.(To avoid potentially forgetting, make a rough drawing of your yard and sketch the areas you plant with crocuses and other bulbs.Bulbs that are bad from the moment you open your newly purchased bag need to go straight back to whoever sold them to you.Say you had a beautiful crop of crocuses last year, but now you notice stunted yellow leaves growing out of the ground and no flowers in sight.Dig up a corm or two and check for fusarium rot, the most likely culprit, according to Janis Ruksans, author of “Crocuses: A Complete Guide to the Genus.”.This disease isn’t likely to affect vernal crocuses once they’ve been planted, so long as you live in USDA Hardiness Zones 3-8.If you live in Zone 9, you can still plant crocuses but you need to chill the bulbs in the refrigerator for 12-15 weeks during the winter.You’ll have to toss out infected bulbs and go easy on the fertilizer (or use none at all), as too much nitrogen can contribute to fusarium rot.To prevent the mold from spreading and killing more of your flowers, cut away all affected parts of the plant and spray what’s left with fungicide.You’ll then need to dig up the corms to check them for those blackish brown spots; if they’re infected, throw them out.Our backyard hosted a colony of witty squirrels who’d sit on my outer kitchen windowsill so I could watch them eat my precious pecans while I washed the dishes.I had a hungry young garden-destroyer that ate all my cabbage one year, plus all the leaves off my apple, plum, and willow trees.The very same night the moose attacked my precious fruit trees, I went to the gardening store and bought supplies to build a moose-proof fence around each one.Plantskydd repels moose, deer, rabbits, voles, elk, opossum, beavers, and otters, should you be lucky enough to get the latter in your own backyard.Plantskydd worked well on my herbs and carrot garden, which I harvested and enjoyed before planting that fated cabbage.Grape hyacinths and snowdrops are perfect for planting in the same trench as crocus corms, as all three have bulbs that need to be buried 3-4 inches deep.Check out this mix of grape hyacinths and daffodils from Eden Brothers for a perfect critter-resistant duo to plant with your crocuses.This can cause bulbs to rot or to produce foliage but no blooms, as they have been busy putting energy into corm development.If you don’t plant your corms deep enough, they might be exposed to too much temperature fluctuation during wintertime, as they are not insulated by the soil.Crocuses like full sunshine or part shade, so keep an eye on how much light they’re getting throughout the day.If the soil you’re planting in is already well-draining, dark, and crumbly – signifying that it’s rich in organic matter – you really don’t need to fertilize the crocuses.So, since they can survive in the cold and snow, have a little patience and keep looking out for those vibrant flowers to pop through the earth! .

Do Deer Eat Saffron Crocus

Do Deer Eat Saffron Crocus

Choose a spot on your property that receives at least 6 hours of sun per day.Prepare your soil by clearing the area of all existing growth.

When Do Crocus Bulbs Flower

When Do Crocus Bulbs Flower

Crocus flowers come in Easter-egg colors of purple, yellow, lavender, cream and white.Over time, these carefree bulbs will naturalize and multiply to produce more flowers every year.Crocus blossoms are magnets for winter-weary bees, who are drawn to the rich, golden pollen inside each flower.The bulbs bloom and die back before most trees and shrubs have leafed out, which means they are suitable for planting in areas that may be shaded in the summer.With good drainage and warmth from nearby stones, they’ll bloom extra early.Flowerbeds and Walkways: Get your flower garden off to an early start by planting crocus along with other spring-blooming bulbs such as tulips, daffodils, muscari and hyacinths.Nestle a few crocus bulbs near the edge of a walkway, pathway or steps and enjoy their delicate blossoms every spring for years to come.To watch a short video about planting crocus and scilla bulbs in a lawn, click HERE.Unlike some bulbs, crocus don’t mind competition from neighboring plants.If these pesky critters are a problem in your yard, you can help protect newly planted bulbs by covering the area with screening or by spraying the soil with a scent deterrent.Snow and extreme cold can damage crocus blossoms that are already open but this will not affect the bulb or future flowers.You can leave them to dry and disappear or give the foliage a gentle tug so it pulls away from the bulb.Over time, large clusters of crocus may become overcrowded and produce fewer flowers.

Crocus And Tulip Flower Show Response To

Crocus And Tulip Flower Show Response To

Crocus bulbs (technically called “corms”) not only provide winter garden color, but they naturalize, meaning that they spread and come back year after year—with minimum care—for an ever-larger display.

How To Grow Crocuses For Saffron

How To Grow Crocuses For Saffron

Saffron is a delicious and colorful seasoning that is used in breads, desserts, and main dishes in many parts of the world, from England to India, from the Middle East to Scandinavia, and all around the Mediterranean.For the home gardener, however, two dozen Saffron Crocus will supply enough of the precious spice in the first year for a few memorable dishes.Then, with each successive year, the corms (which look like bulbs) will multiply, the size of the planting will increase, and you'll be able to harvest more of the spicy stigmas.If gophers, mice, or voles are a problem in your garden, plant the corms in containers or line the bed with hardware cloth or a similar wire mesh.After the first few frosts, but before the ground has frozen solid, carefully dig out the corms, place them in a wooden crate or plastic tub, and completely cover with dry peat moss or sand.After the plants die back in the fall, move the pots into the basement and store them dry for the winter.To use saffron, steep the threads in hot liquid (water, broth, or milk, depending on the recipe) for about 20 minutes.

Where's The Best Place To Plant Crocuses

Where's The Best Place To Plant Crocuses

Crocus bulbs (technically called “corms”) not only provide winter garden color, but they naturalize, meaning that they spread and come back year after year—with minimum care—for an ever-larger display.

What Type Of Crocus Does Saffron Come From

What Type Of Crocus Does Saffron Come From

Nevertheless a modest pinch of saffron will still set you back considerably more than a fancy coffee.But a few strands of saffron go a very long way, and growing this pretty autumn-flowering bulb isn’t difficult.As the petals unfurl the crimson stigmas within are finally revealed, all wiry and exposed, like delicate antennae reaching out into the wide-open world.If your soil gets boggy or is reluctant to drain after a period of sustained rain then the bulbs are liable to simply rot away.They may not flower in their first autumn but will burst reassuringly into life in early spring when the strappy leaves push through.For such a dainty-looking bloom saffron is exceptionally hardy, coping with temperatures well below freezing – in both Celsius and Fahrenheit.Warm up with a good stretch then get down onto your hands and knees for the fiddly yet ultimately rewarding job of harvesting.Saffron is a beautiful spice that lends color and subtle perfume to a range of dishes spanning savory and sweet.With your own supply to hand you’ll be more inclined to explore the many culinary opportunities it offers, safe from that hefty price tag! .